Bakez0151

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Did Obama really bring the change he promised, and the change many placed their faith that he would? He has not changed anything in terms of issues mentioned in this song at least…

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A common sentiment from rappers that their struggle has left them to no other choice but crime and they are more a victim of unfortunate circumstance more than anything else. Struggle and desperation being a common theme of Koke’s music.

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As seen by his recent 7 month incarceration on remand followed by an acquittal of all charges. Apparently simply charged because of unclear CCTV footage, it is undoubted that Koke’s reputation that he states in this song was the reason for the apparent wrongful arrest. It’s worth noting however that this song was made before he was arrested.

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Reminiscent of Jay-Z in Renegade. ‘How you rate music that thugs with nothing relate to?’ The overwhelming message being that if you are dissing Koke for his content, perhaps his music wasn’t intended for you anyway.

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Although a general comment, a reference would be Darren Mathurin — also known as “Spider” ‘Britain’s first black supergrass’ and a former associate of Koke’s from Stonebridge. And. of course, previously dissed in the notorious “Are You Alone Fam”

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April 29th, 2012

loads of guys talk big,but when they get caught they start snitching because they cant handle the walls in a cell,so they talk big on the roads but cant talk in jail

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“Death around the corner” but Koke wants a place with God, in spite of everything

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He’d ask for redemption, but also guidance on his path in life, however rough, even though it may be down to his fault, it will be

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This is why he’s done the things he mentioned at the beginning and why he needs love…

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Excuses for his “sins”?

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April 29th, 2012

shits real in the ends hes got a daughter to think about and to feed and all these people want to kill him,and hes got all the stress on his head and it seems unfair

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Everyone is human, no matter their basic needs everybody needs some security

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I think this whole verse up to now is Jay Z being deliberately obtuse, highlighting his double-standards, blaming her for his own discretions when it had an inevitable result. The last two lines is Jay Z seemingly coming to terms with the fact it’s his fault the relationship is over.

"Man, I look in the eyes of our kid / This whole life, a k..." (Jay Z – Soon You'll Understand) | pending

I don’t think there’s a particular reason to think the verses are autobiographical or even from just one person’s viewpoint. The first one in particular is Scarface inspired. Three different scenarios.

"And there I go, trapped in the Kit-Kat again" (Jay Z – 99 Problems) | accepted

The advertising tagline of the aforementioned chocolate bar being the key to this line and its meaning I think.

I’d say it was more about emotional extortion or trying to get the male protagonist to ‘think about wifing (her)’ — the next line seems doubtful of her actual pregnancy than actual financial gain. Also it seems to be the male’s friends words rather than from the narrator, although this is rather unclear.

"Don’t wanna fight, don’t wanna fuss / You the mother of m..." (Jay Z – Soon You'll Understand) | pending

No. It’s just not autobiographical. Not everything has to be.

"Dear ma, I'm in the cell, lonely as hell" (Jay Z – Soon You'll Understand) | accepted

More intuitive listeners will pick up on the fact that not everything Jay-Z raps about is supposed to be auto-biographical, indeed, most of it isn’t. It’s a work of art. Jay-Z is telling 3 different stories in this song. This verse is from the perspective of someone who has gone to prison and is writing to his Mom in an attempt to make her understand why.

I’d say the reference to Obama makes it almost seem as if being ‘born in the trap’ is simply being born an African-American. The two are hard to separate.

"It takes a lot to shock us / But you being so prosperous ..." (Jay Electronica – Shiny Suit Theory) | pending

More to the feel of the verse is that the thought that a black man could attain such a level of success as Jay-Z is describing is ‘preposterous’, even to someone who is a therapist/doctor and has dealt with people with mental disorders… who would have told them many grand delusions and crazy shit basically… Even this shocks them!

"Cause now with paper, shit is still ghetto" (Nas – We Will Survive) | accepted

What he’s saying here is that despite them attaining the riches that you would assume would move them away from the ‘ghetto’ risks, such as being shot at, it really hasn’t and is evident in BIG being shot. You can take the kid out the hood but you can’t take the hood out the kid.

^ I think it applies to both meanings, knowing Jay-Z, to be fair. Reference to Jay-Z’s more viscous street past and at the same time what you said.