Won't you believe it? It's just my luck
Won't you believe it? It's just my luck
Won't you believe it? It's just my luck
Won't you believe it? It's just my luck

No recess
No recess
No recess

Won't you believe it? It's just my luck
Won't you believe it? It's just my luck
Won't you believe it? It's just my luck

No recess
No recess
No recess

[Solo]

You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again
You're in high school again!

No recess
No recess
No recess
No recess
No recess
No recess
No recess
School by Nirvana

The song is about a high school student becoming a janitor at the same high-school he studied at, which most likely sucked for him. “Wouldn’t you believe it it’s just my luck” referred to the chances of becoming janitor at your old high-school. “No recess” referred to the fact that janitors don’t have recess.

This is based on Cobain’s own experiences. in fact right after he dropped out he became a janitor at his high school and saw all his classmates where still there

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Dan
October 24th, 2013

Apparently according to Cobain and Michael Azzerad this is a critique of the Seattle music scene

April 18th, 2014

Dan is correct in what the song is thought to stand for, though the original meaning presents an interesting concept, as Kurt’s unability to locate a job after being kicked out of his mother’s lead him to have to work the janitor job at the very school he saw his former classmates at.

Bruce Pavitt spoke of an interesting turn in the song here relating to Cobain’s perception of the crowd and possible motivation to continuously play the song long after it was recorded.

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Jimmy quit and Jody got married Summer Of '69 by Bryan Adams

According to Co-songwriter Jim Vallance:

I remember Bryan and I going back and forth on this line. I suggested “Woody quit and Gordy got married”, like the guys in my high-school band, but Bryan thought “Jimmy” and “Jody” sounded better, and I had to agree.

I’m not sure where Bryan got the name “Jimmy” — we didn’t discuss it at the time — but in a recent interview he said it was a reference to one of his early drummers.

“Jody” is definitely Bryan’s sound-man, Jody Perpik, who got married around the time we were working on the song. Jody and his wife appear in Bryan’s video for “Summer Of ‘69”, driving away with a “Just Married” sign on the back of their car.

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Me and some guys from school
Had a band and we tried real hard
Summer Of '69 by Bryan Adams

According to Co-songwriter Jim Vallance:

Bryan’s first band “Shock” played Top-40 songs in Vancouver night clubs … it was 1976 and Bryan was 16. My first band, “The Tremelones”, was formed in 1965 in Vanderhoof with some “guys from school”. I was 13 and the other fellows were a bit older, maybe 16 or 17.

Wayne Deorksen and Gordy Keith played guitar, and I played drums. Gordy’s friend Dave Snell played bass with us for a while. Dave ordered a Silvertone bass guitar and amplifier from the Sears catalogue.

We changed our name to The Fourmost, and my neighbour Chuck Davies joined the band for a while too. Chuck was really old (twenty-one), plus he’d recently travelled to England, so he had instant credibility!

Chuck had an electric guitar with a silver sparkle finish — a marvellous thing to behold — and a Fender amp. None of us could sing very well, so we mostly played instrumentals by The Ventures and The Shadows. “Walk Don’t Run” and “Wipeout” were a couple of our favourites.

Before joining The Tremelones or The Fourmost, I spent most lunch-hours in the school music room with “Woody” Whitmore. Woody is the first musician I ever played with, and I have fond memories of those mid-day “jam sessions”. Lacking a drum kit of my own, I’d pound on the school’s snare drum and cymbal while Woody played his electric guitar through a small amp.

When the music room was occupied, Woody and I would use the school library, which was closed for the lunch hour. But our “rock music” annoyed my Grade 8 French teacher, Mrs. Morrissey, whose classroom was directly across the hallway from the library. In a futile attempt to enlist my parents and shut me down, Mrs. Morrissey put a nasty comment in my report card: “Jim’s mind is never on the job. He can’t just drum his life away”.

It didn’t work. Forty-five years later I still play the drums!

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Was the summer of '69 Summer Of '69 by Bryan Adams

According to Adams, who came up with the title, the number 69 is used in reference to sex, and not the year 1969:

“It’s a very simple song about looking back on the summertime and making love. For me, the ‘69 was a metaphor for making love not about the year. I had someone in Spain ask me once why I wrote the first line 'I had my first real sex dream’… I had to laugh.”

However, his co-writer Jim Vallance claims that it has nothing to do with the sex position.

According to Co-songwriter Jim Vallance:

This is where the phrase “summer of ‘69” appears for the first time … quite casually, as line #4 of the first verse. It’s interesting to note: in our first draft of the song, the lyric “summer of '69” appears only once, never to be repeated. It wasn’t the title, it was just another line in the song. In fact, we originally planned on calling the song “Best Days Of My Life”.

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Played it til my fingers bled Summer Of '69 by Bryan Adams

According to Co-songwriter Jim Vallance:

Anyone who’s ever played a guitar knows the strings can be brutal on your fingers when you’re first learning. I played my new guitar all Christmas day 1965, and half that night. I remember my dad coming down about one o'clock in the morning, telling me to get to sleep because I was keeping everybody up. I actually played it ‘til my fingers bled.

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I got my first real six string
Bought it at the five and dime
Summer Of '69 by Bryan Adams

According to Co-songwriter Jim Vallance:

When I was growing up in the 1950’s and 60’s there were shops called “Five and Dime” where you could (supposedly) buy anything for five or ten cents, which wasn’t always true. Now they call them “Dollar Stores”!

Neither Bryan or I ever bought a guitar at the “Five and Dime”. I got my first guitar from my parents, Christmas 1965, when I was thirteen. Bryan bought his first guitar at a pawn shop in 1972, age twelve.

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Upwards to the vanguard
Where the pressure is so high
Under the microscope
Hope against hope

Forging for the future
But to sacrifice their lives
Both of them side by side
So determined
Race For The Prize by The Flaming Lips

Contrary to the opening verse, in this verse the feeling is that the scientists are cooperating in their struggle. They’re racing, but it’s not necessarily against each other. Against time, against danger. The term “side by side” is usually used for allies… in a competition it would be “neck and neck” or “head to head.” That makes the song a lot happier!

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Elias
June 13th, 2013

As the politicians reach higher seats, their mistakes become costlier. News concentrates and picks apart every thing politicians do, “under the microscope.”

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Two scientists are racing
For the cure of all mankind
Both of them side by side
So determined

Locked in heated battle
For the cure that is their prize
But it's so dangerous
But they're determined
Race For The Prize by The Flaming Lips

There’s something about academic competition, that although they’re working together racing towards something that may be for the good of all mankind, there’s still a sizable amount of selfish motive in what they are doing. Also the competition aspect says something unfair about the world of science in that although people may put the same effort into something, the prize is still won and lost and losers are often forgotten.

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Elias
June 13th, 2013

The two scientists are political scientists. The two are candidates running against each other

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Inside my mother in a garbage bin The King of Carrot Flowers Pts. Two & Three by Neutral Milk Hotel

Perhaps “my mother the garbage bin” is a reference to King Of Carrot Flowers Pt. 1, where Jeff says “And your mom would stick a fork right into daddy’s shoulder / And dad would throw the garbage all across the floor”.

In that light, the line could mean that the mother is a receptacle for a lot of verbal, emotional, or even physical abuse from the father. He lays all his negativity, aggression, and disappointment (his garbage) in her.

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April 8th, 2014

I interpreted this differently. I thought that this imagery related to the overall theme of humans being disposable, which relates to Anne Frank and the Holocaust (see “it’s so sad to see the world agree that they’d rather see their faces filled with flies,” or “I know they buried her body with others,
Her sister and mother and 500 families.”) When he sings this, I envisioned a fetus floating in the womb of a pregnant Holocaust victim who was thrown into a mass grave like a piece of garbage. The fetus is swimming through the waves and undertow in utero, and can only float because they haven’t been born and can’t swim yet. In the final line, the baby reveals that he will float until he “finds himself again,” i.e., is reborn in the next life.

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I love you Jesus Christ
Jesus Christ I love you
Yes I do
The King of Carrot Flowers Pts. Two & Three by Neutral Milk Hotel

The lines “I love you Jesus Christ, Jesus Christ I love you” are replaced in the booklet for the album with a small explanation by Jeff.

…and now a song for Jesus Christ. And since this seems to confuse people I’d like to simply say that I mean what I sing although the theme of endless endless on this album is not based on any religion but more in the belief that all things seem to contain a white light within them that I see as eternal."

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April 14th, 2014

Doesn’t this line somehow suggest an ambiguity as to who he loves? Like some of E.E. Cummings' poetry, I think this is intentionally ambiguous- he may be referring to the girl that he was talking about before or Jesus Christ.

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