Yet I,
A dull and muddy-mettled rascal, peak,
Like John-a-dreams, unpregnant of my cause,
And can say nothing; no, not for a king,
Upon whose property and most dear life
A damn'd defeat was made. Am I a coward?
Hamlet Act 2 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Hamlet vents feelings of guilt and self-loathing because he’s unable to express himself in the urgency of crisis, whereas an actor, who isn’t even experiencing what he’s experiencing in real life, can express his feelings with realism and eloquence.

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O, that this too too solid flesh would melt
Thaw and resolve itself into a dew!
Or that the Everlasting had not fix'd
His canon 'gainst self-slaughter!
Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

In these lines, Hamlet reveals his suicidal thoughts. He wishes that he would evaporate into nothing or that God had not forbid suicide.

In Elizabethan times suicide was believed to be a one way ticket to Hell, which in Hamlet’s mind would have been slightly worse than living with his mother and stepfather.

The idea of a suicidal Hamlet, though, is by no means agreed upon by all scholars. Hamlet could be merely be in mourning for his father, and be wishing he had the ability to disappear, rather than listen to the flattery of courtiers and deal with his mother’s “o'erhasty marriage."
The line about "self-slaughter” certainly seems to lend itself to an interpretation of a suicidal Hamlet, but coming on the heels of such poetic images as his wishing he were capable of melting and turning into dew, it is possible that he is merely being dramatic. Just a thought.

Meanwhile, the reading “too, too solid flesh” is not agreed upon, either. The First Folio reads “solid flesh,” while the Second Quarto has “sallied flesh.” Some modern editors have favored a reading not found in either F1 or Q2: “sullied flesh.” Those who prefer sallied understand Hamlet to be feeling set upon by forces out of his control, while those who favor sullied seem to think he is feeling tainted by his mother’s inappropriate relationship with his uncle.

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These indeed seem,
For they are actions that a man might play:
But I have that within which passeth show;
These but the trappings and the suits of woe.
Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

These symptoms do make him seem depressed, but they are exterior displays that any man could fake. What Hamlet suffers from most is the internal feeling of despair which no other person can witness.

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bren
April 15th, 2014

Hamlet is telling his mother that he truly feels the way he looks (melancholy and depressed) and his exterior portrayal of his emotions are only an intimation of these feelings.

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'Tis not alone my inky cloak, good mother,
Nor customary suits of solemn black,
Nor windy suspiration of forced breath,
No, nor the fruitful river in the eye,
Nor the dejected 'havior of the visage,
Together with all forms, moods, shapes of grief,
That can denote me truly:
Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Hamlet describes symptoms of depression to his mother, saying that it is not his habit of wearing all black, or difficulty speaking, his constant crying, or any other customary displays of melancholy that can truly define his despair.

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A little more than kin, and less than kind. Hamlet Act 1 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

A famous quote from the play; Hamlet makes a play on words to imply that Claudius is more than family (or kin) because not only is he Hamlet’s uncle, he is now his stepfather as well. Adding one more letter to kin would make him kind, but Hamlet expresses his distaste by claiming he is not so.

Although most modern editions of Hamlet indicate this line as an aside, and thus audible to the audience but not Claudius, it is not marked so in either the First Folio or the Second Quarto (the two most authoritative editions). Therefore, many actors have played this as a snarky comment directly to Claudius, while a few have played it as Hamlet talking to himself (or thinking it in his head in voiceover, as Ken Branagh presents it in his film).

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Long live the king! Hamlet Act 1 Scene 1 by William Shakespeare

The play begins shortly after a new King has just been crowned. Hamlet’s father, King Hamlet, has died and his brother Claudius has taken the throne.

This line also sets an expectation, reinforced lightly throughout this scene, that an audience should be rooting for the defense of the King, one of the few unambiguous cues set in 1.1.

Of course, from Act I, Scene II onward, the play encourages the opposite expectation, as it finds itself rooting against Claudius.

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Maiden and Priest were the gods that we praised Fat Lip by Sum 41

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Heavy metal and mullets it's how we were raised Fat Lip by Sum 41

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January 11th, 2014

They’re trying to declare that they all had a trailer trash upbringing, but again, they’re from Ajax, ON

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We laugh when old people fall Fat Lip by Sum 41

Funny, right?

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When I'm hangin' out drinking in the back of an El Camino Fat Lip by Sum 41

Sweet ride, bruh.

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January 11th, 2014

An El Camino is an iconic vehicle of Southern Redneck culture. Drinking in the back is thought to be the epitome of white trashiness. This is very poserish because Sum 41 is from Ajax, Ontario, a very middle class suburb.

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