1 For I want you to know how much I am struggling for you, and for those in Laodicea, and for all who have not seen me face to face. Colossians 2 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

Laodicea on the Lycus was the ancient metropolis of Phrygia Pacatiana, is one of the Seven churches of Asia mentioned in the Book of Revelation.

There are several reasons that scholars have doubted that this was written by Paul. One, for instance: the epistle’s language doesn’t seem to match Paul’s, with 48 words appearing in Colossians that are found nowhere else in his writings and 33 of which occur nowhere else in the New Testament.


The city of Colossae was in the Roman province of Asia, a region that is now part of Turkey. The Church had not been founded by Paul, it seems, he had not been there when he wrote the letter to the Colossians. It is likely that Epaphras, fellow worker of Paul, was the first to announce the gospel to the Colossians — [1:7, 4:12]
In the last greetings [4:7 — 17] Paul asks that this epistle be sent to the Church of Laodicea, and that Christians of Laodicea send the letter to the Colossians that Paul had written to them.
The letter to Colossesnses was brought to them by Tychicus and Onesimus [Slavery] as he traveled, for whom Paul wrote the Letter to Philemon.

It semes that Paul wrote a letter to the Ekklesia of Laodicea, and unfortunately that letter was lost.


Paul is clearly concerned that the church at Laodicea be supported. He says here that he has been struggling for it, and he gives further details in Colossians 4:13-16.

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March 4th, 2014

In spite of the many disagreement about who could be the author of book of the Colossians, we straight away learn that this book is most fascinatingly throwing a new ray of light and hope of a new life for those who believe in Lord Jesus Christ.

INn fact, Colossians in one of the scriptures that is well-known richer Christian doctrination and courage to face even the earthly slave masters with very hot pieces of messages. Under Col 2:5, Paul is seen receiving a report from Epaphras of very positive developments in the church at Colosse adding that the congregants there should, Col 3:4, keep their focus on God the Almighty and thier eyes all the time strained to the ultimate goal.

The letter in issuing specific instructions, Col 3:18, commanding wives to be subject to their husbands as is befitting the Lord. To another extreme, husbands are equally being commanded, Col 3:19 to love their wives tenderly handle them free of harshness.

Likewise, in the same book we see Slaves being advised, in Col 3:22-24, to obay their earthly masters, even jn their abscence that they are pleased, but to most whole-heartedly should accord fear to the Lord above in heaven. Conversely, in (Col 4:1), slave masters are being asked to treat their slaves justly and fairly, for you know that you too have a Master up in heaven.

Lastly, we note a very unique feature in this letter in the sense that it is really down-toned in a manner that is most spectacularly full of soothing teachings, humble and much seeking to see superior ethica life standards for enhanced appearance, harmony, and at peace all-round out day-to-day lives.

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February 24th, 2014

It is my understanding that Paul wrote this letter while in prison. He was made aware of the Colossians were being misled by false teachers who emphasized Christ’s relation to the cosmos, stressing the importance of angels, astral powers and other disciplines. Paul is struggling mainly because being in prison meant not being able to be there face to face to respond to the attacks on the practices to the faith .

February 10th, 2014

Thanks @MarcosRegnaldoCaldiera… very informative post.

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2 I want their hearts to be encouraged and united in love, Colossians 2 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

Can you contribute to the understanding of this line? Suggest an annotation below!

This suggestion appears to be original work and yet citations would have been nice.

Paul is still combating division and dissension in the church, not necessarily due to sin in this case rather due to people raising up arguments against what Paul has been preaching. Paul wants all the followers of Christ in Laodicea “to be encouraged and united in love.”

These arguments against Paul’s teaching has made it seem that Paul is trying to keep something from them, not teaching correcting or withholding truth. That is why he is letting them know that he wants them to have “all the riches of assured understanding; the point is to know Christ. The encouragement is for them to stand strong in the faith against the onslaught of what Paul calls "plausible arguments.”

The long list of arguments that Paul lists are most likely things that the Jewish people are condemning the Gentiles for not doing or doing. Paul is struggling for them because he wants both Jewish and Gentile converts to be united as one, not arguing amongst themselves. It is hurtful dissonance in Paul’s spirit. I am sure that Gentile converts who were listening to the so called “plausible arguments” were trying to also convince their Gentile counterparts to keep the law according to the Jews etc.

It is this division that pangs Paul much like the division that exists today within the modern day ekklesia which also pangs me greatly. We should be united in love knowing that if we all believe in the same God then He will lead all of us according to His will for our lives; for it is according to our willingness to trust Him that He leads us. We have trouble trusting God with our own lives so we definitely cannot trust God with other people lives, therefore we intervene and try to impose our convictions on them instead of simply sharing them and leaving the results up to God. This is what I believe was happening in Laodicea, and in Colossae.

Like them, we must realize that we all have a part to play. Everybody is not meant to do the same thing or serve God the same way. Whether we honor God on Sat or Sunday or everyday, should we condemn another person who doesn’t? If Catholics want to believe in the Apocrapha should we condemn them or if women are preaching the same gospel as men? What’s the alternative, people not hear the gospel and be saved from their sins, judgement, and impending eternal punishment? What is more important salvation or tradition and ritual? Nobody has it 100% right. Jesus is the only 100% answer we need. That is what Paul preached!

Paul says in Romans 8:1, “There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.” In Romans 14:4-5 Paul also says, “Who are you to pass judgment on servants of another? It is before their own lord that they stand or fall. And they will be upheld, for the Lord is able to make them stand. Some judge one day to be better than another, while others judge all days to be alike. Let all be fully convinced in their own minds.”

Listen to Jesus. He says in John 13:34, “I give you a new commandment, that you love one another. Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another.” If everyone can learn to lovingly share their convictions, but leave it between the person and God to live out the way that they feel they should be honoring God then the world would be a better place, “hearts…encouraged and united in love.”

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February 4th, 2014

to be encouraged; confirm the possibility of poverty in the church, they were discouraged waiting for help from Paul which did not arrived. some began to doubt Paul, while other do. maybe the new converts are those that more confused and discourage, that was why in vs 1 Paul make reference"those who have not sees me face to face" he did that to make them feel he also care about them.. it’s possible that, some one wrote to Paul about the problem that was going on and what the new converts may have been saying.

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So that they may have all the riches of assured understanding and have the knowledge of God's mystery, that is, Christ himself,

3 in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.
Colossians 2 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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there are two important phrases i notice here that may give us more light about the problem that was going on in the church.

1, “may have all the riches assure.”

In vs 3, “hidden all the treasure”;

Paul using the word to of God to deliver message of encouragement to those who are in need. He uses the term “richness and treasure” which both mean wealth.

By hearing these words,
It’s likely the church will look at it like these:
God will give you your treasure and make you rich.
although at the end of these two phrases, follows,
“the knowledge of God"
which may likely be his main reason but these words give another meaning to he who is in a particular situation.

Most churches today,
use such phrases to preach wealth rather than salvation.

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February 3rd, 2014

Paul agreed with the Colossians and he presented “Mystery” to them, this mystery was the very thing lay at the heart of all Paul’s preaching; the simple fact of Jesus own life within them, whatever the believer may need, it can be found in Christ for in him are laid all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.

February 26th, 2014

Paul reminds about the true Wisdom.

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February 24th, 2014

Paul is warning the church in Colossae, Laodicea specifically, about false teachers. He is admonishing them to follow the gospel as it was first preached, following Christ, who in turn, is the one who gives true knowledge and wisdom to those who believe in Him.

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February 6th, 2014

here Paul seems to be taking us back to ‘lady Wisdom’ in his Jewish roots?

sol4sci
February 27th, 2014

Christ is wisdom and knowledge and we have this if we live in Christ.

February 5th, 2014

Paul’s letter refers Christ as the fulfilled of knowledge and wisdom. Imagine Paul’s worldview comes from Jewish tradition situated in Greek Hellenization plus His encountered with resurrected Christ made him totally change his worldview that what he had previously are only the beginning not the end which the end is in Christ Jesus.

February 4th, 2014

This chapter discusses about freedom from human regulations through life with Christ.

Paul reminds believers that their acceptance of the Lord is a manifestation of the power which guided them to do so. And urged them be steadfast since their calling upon Him is not by human duties.

Paul noted how important it is to be always with the Head which is Jesus Christ.

February 5th, 2014

God’s wisdom and knowledge can be revealed as long as you are willing to be faithful in the good news of Christ.

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18 Do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery; Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

In 1 Corinthians Paul spoke of the believers who were getting drunk at the Lord’s supper.1 Corinthians 11.20-21

In the Psalms, wine was called that which makes a heart glad.

Wine: not bad in itself- but

it’s in the way that you use it.

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February 4th, 2014

Wine in general was not a problem, Paul thought Timothy would benefit from drinking a bit, and Jesus surely had no problem with it at the wedding in Cana.
The problem lies in the lack of self-control. When Paul admonished those who exhibited bad behavior at a time of communal eating, and drinking(Eucharist), when they could not wait for others to arrive, and they gorged themselves, and just made a mockery of the whole affair.
http://poetry.rapgenius.com/St-paul-1-corinthians-11-nrsv-annotated#note-2678767

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February 3rd, 2014

It is amazing to me how so many faiths make such strong and adamant stands against wine et al when it is quite clear that the problem with alcohol is excess (like so many other things)

February 5th, 2014

getting drunk was a sign of going back to old ways of life and its desires.paul says don’t be filled with a false high .as being drunk,but to be filled with the holy spirits everlasting joy.

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26 in order to make her holy by cleansing her with the washing of water by the word,

27 so as to present the church to himself in splendor, without a spot or wrinkle or anything of the kind—yes, so that she may be holy and without blemish.
Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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February 4th, 2014

Would this be ritual purification in a mikveh? But the early Christians don’t seem to have a mikveh so what and where would the “washing” be?

March 3rd, 2014

An husband who has faith and follow the gospels will lead to the salvation of his wife because he is the head of the couple, so he is responsible to teach the word to his wife.

February 21st, 2014

Reading the Word of God is a purifying process. It is a dynamic thing in that you can read it superficially and get meaning from it, then study it in greater depth and get so much more from it.

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February 16th, 2014

@ChristineM washing of water by the word, means baptizing with the word of the gospel, God or Jesus. It does not mean ritual purification.

February 6th, 2014

The husband is to be the spiritual leader of his wife. He is to teach her from the word of God as of cleansing water pouring down on her to purify her.

February 4th, 2014

As much as Paul loves to say that one does not need to be circumcised, or follow other Jewish Laws, this seems to be one he doesn’t mind following:

Ritual Purification

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25 Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her, Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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February 7th, 2014

It seems that with these words, God through Paul lifts the ground and essence of marital love far beyond the standards of the world. It is a very sad fact that most people enter the marital bond with the intention of enhancing their own lives or increasing their personal pleasure; and it is not an exaggeration to say that all people enter marriage expecting some form of self-satisfaction. And by this behavior we are simply implementing the common thought-processes used in everyday business—we choose this specific school, or that particular career, based on the advantages that will accrue to us. But in marriage, the meaning and purpose are completely reversed: we are to seek the advantages and well-being of another, instead of, or even in opposition to, our own.

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February 3rd, 2014

How often this verses are taken out of context! Abusive husbands rely on verse 23, and feel entitled to abuse others, but forget to read verse 25, where the husband is to love his wife just as Christ loved the church, this is what these husbands should imitate: Christ.

February 26th, 2014

This part is key in the male-female debate. Paul teaches that woman is like the church, and the husband is like Christ. No power struggle or violence here.

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February 7th, 2014

I totally agree with you Nohemi. Also some wives would often quote verse 25 to their husbands but forgot verse 23. Marriage is a take and give situation. Love and respect work hand and hand.

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February 6th, 2014

too many men and women forget this part of the teaching

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22 Wives, be subject to your husbands as you are to the Lord.

23 For the husband is the head of the wife just as Christ is the head of the church, the body of which he is the Savior.

24 Just as the church is subject to Christ, so also wives ought to be, in everything, to their husbands.
Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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February 4th, 2014

ValAnne, You are right that these are 1 century ideas and cultures. But what about Christians in modern times, citing those same passages as the word of God, and subjecting others to those same 1 century attitudes.?

February 4th, 2014

So remain submissive to your husband even if he is violent toward you?

February 3rd, 2014

Once more all those teachings regarding women are highly questionable and written according to lot of scholars after Paul’s death, like the epistles to Timothy and possibly to the Colossians.

Gary
February 4th, 2014

The excuse making for Paul’s anti-women, pro-slavery rants as just being a “product of his culture” are amazing.

February 4th, 2014

The apostle exhorts married Christians to a strong mutual love. Holding with Gn 2:24 that marriage is a divine institution (Eph 5:31), Paul sees Christian marriage as taking on a new meaning symbolic of the intimate relationship of love between Christ and the church. The wife should serve her husband in the same spirit as that of the church’s service to Christ (Eph 5:22, 24), and the husband should care for his wife with the devotion of Christ to the church (Eph 5:25–30). Paul gives to the Genesis passage its highest meaning in the light of the union of Christ and the church, of which Christlike loyalty and devotion in Christian marriage are a clear reflection (Eph 5:31–33).

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February 4th, 2014

Yes, Paul is saying for woman to be submissive to their husbands; however, in the next line he is telling the men to love their wives as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her. To me, that is an illustration of love that is submissive to the wife as well.

February 3rd, 2014

I think this owes something to the ideas of Aristotle, too. The thing we need to concentrate on is to understand and appreciate how these matters were regarded at the time of writing. Many people, both men and women, in first and second centuries CE would have regarded the ideas written in these verses of the text as quite natural and rather nice —if a bit on the optimistic side. I am pretty sure home life proceeded then in many ways much as it does now.

February 8th, 2014

Controversy on verse about husband-wife or master-slave relation in Paul’s writing has got to do with 21st century interpretation — and not 1st century writing.

Paul writes about managing a relationship — starting v 21 “be subject to one another…”. To convey this singular idea, he goes on to explain each one in sentences. So you need to read each sentence and come back to the central idea he is trying to convey.

However, 21st century people get excited and seize v 22 “wives, be subject to…” or v 25 “husband, love your ….” depending on which side you are to achieve their own agenda or justify their action. They ignore subject theme in v 21 “be subject to one another…”. And the rest of the readers or analyst condemn Paul’s writing or qualify this to be a fake by taking the phrase or verse as a stand alone directive. Worst is when certain words has negative connotation such as ‘slave’ to the Americans or others in the modern days.

There is a natural order of relationship roles whether 1st century or 21st century. Husband-wife or master-slave (like ‘employer-employee’) is a hierarchical position for orderly management of household or societal function with each a different role to play in both past or present era. Paul did not suppress one for the other — he says “be subject to one another..”. We are the ones who twist his meaning by claiming ‘scholarly justification’.

Hopefully, the better analysis and interpretation this Harvard course with the views of different participants enlighten us significantly what Paul’s writing really is.

February 7th, 2014

The cultural context we find Aristotle and Paul is quite different that we see perhaps today. The order and hierarchy is undeniable but I wonder if we have to view some of the stipulations in these writings through our cultural and contemporary lenses to arrive at the essence of these sayings. “Let the woman be silent” is not going to happen where I live and worship. “Women be subject to their husbands in everything” doesn’t ring well with women who have been physically, verbally and psychologically abused by an overbearing controlling male. So what can be make of it? I understand the patriarchal context from which both Aristotle and Paul write and advise but it is so far removed from this present contemporary culture that I think hard line strict adherence to the letter of the law here would be more than challenging. The question remains, “How do we take the then and there and bring it to the here and now and allow it to help us in our Christian context? I think this is where the "spirit of the law” rather than the “letter of the law” comes into play. In her introduction video to this course Dr. Nasrallah, said that religion can be very dangerous. I work as a pastor and a therapist and I have seen these texts used in very abusive ways and people hurt in so many ways. Yet I love and cherish and believe these letters to be God’s Word for his church. When I read these words, I am always reminded of the words of Jesus, “You heard it said…but I say.” There is a law but then there is the spirit behind the law. What is Paul’s real intent. I find it very hard to believe that Paul would want any women to subject herself to an abusive man. Neither do I believe that Paul wouldn’t want a women to be silent when she need’s to speak up! I am not advocating liberalism with the Words of God. Paul wrote within a specific culture and his listeners had a little problem understanding and grasping his intent and meaning. We need to be careful that we don’t subject people to wrongful things for the sake of our interpretation of doctrine. It could be rather dangerous.

February 5th, 2014

Here Paul put a conditional argument: Wives, [be in subjection] unto your own husbands,[…], But “Husbands, love your wives, […].

Then, ShelleyMae, if the husband doesn´t love his wife, so she do not have to be subject to her husband.

February 5th, 2014

Why did Paul consider it so necessary to try to regulate relationships within the home? If ekklesia members mismanage their homes they could not possibly manage the community of the ekklesia? (That is a doubtful connection. A good community worker is not necessarily a good wife, husband, mother, or father. Some skills would be transferable.) And it would get the ekklesia a poor name in the wider community?

Paul does acknowledge that marriage is a great mystery 5:32. Therefore a wise person would tread warily.

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February 5th, 2014

This again is probably what Paul was referring to when he spoke to women “to learn in silence and not to teach”. It was probably spoken into the family context in 1 Timothy.

February 4th, 2014

This is a good example of how 1st and 2nd century ideas don’t translate well to twenty-first century people/.

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February 4th, 2014

This passage has always being controversial and the authorship of this is questionable since previously he stated that they both own each other bodies. This passage has been misused by “church folks"who believe that women are inferior to men

February 3rd, 2014

Pure Aristotle; does it show Paul’s familiarity with the philosopher, or is the work of a later hand with an agenda?

March 3rd, 2014

This passage really feels as though the revolution’s over! Gone is the radicalism of 1 Corinthians — of living as a celibate, or living with your wife as if you didn’t have one. Of Paul wanting everyone to be celibate like him. Now the forces of dull conformity and conservatism have reasserted themselves. We’re not waiting for the imminent return of Christ any more the church is trying to set itself up as part of the establishment and fall into line with the hierarchies and the systems of power, oppression and social control around it in the wider world. The Acts of Paul and Thecla represents that radical strand of the church that has never been happy with this and will continue to struggle against natural conservatism, but it’s a minority voice.

February 26th, 2014

Paul is instructing the wives to submit to their husband, we should also think the social status of women during this time in the ancient world where some women as less educated than men, submission could mean, learn from your husbands. When we are in Christ, we learn how to love, not in human standards but in God’s standards. a husband and wife should love and respect each other as how Christ love them.

February 25th, 2014

I agree with teo9113.

February 16th, 2014

“Wifes, be subject to your husbands” is an advice in he incipient Church. It is not Revelation received by anyone.

February 9th, 2014

Eph 5:22 — 24 reflects the same mindset as that presented in Col 2.
The overall intent both in the undisputed letters of Paul as well as those attributed to him seems to be to have the gospel en grafted in to the society and culture in each church location so that the gospel would be seemlessly integrated.
It may seemed to have not worked initially, but given the extraordinary success of the church and the spread of Christianity it seemed have worked in the long run

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February 8th, 2014

I wonder if Paul were writing this today, having been brought up in 20th centure culture if he might have omitted these verses?

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February 3rd, 2014

Paul calls for mutual submission, one to the other. And I love the description above from walidghazala. One cannot understand submission to another without understanding the submission of Christ to His church.

February 3rd, 2014

This certainly is in line with Aristotle’s right ordering of society. It has unfortunately continued to cause contention since Ephesians was written. Having the relationship of the “wife” to the “man” does not allow the female person in this case to be anything other than the “wife.” Woman? Human? No, wife. Someone told me once that as a single person I was certainly capable of managing my household (as in Aristotle’s household management), but that if I got married, Paul says I become the wife and therefore the man will manage the household. Unmarried—enough brains? Married—not enough? “Divine ordering?” “The relationship of Christ Jesus to his church?” A question then is how do we honor the canon of the New Testament while recognizing that some things are just pure rot.

March 4th, 2014

Women are never made second to men in general, but the wife is specifically called to accept her husband’s leadership and not endeavor to dominate (Gen. 3:16). The Husband must lead with mutual respect.(V.21)

The Bible does not put males over females, but it does call for husbands to accept responsible leadership in the same spirit of self-giving and devotion Christ has shown for His church.

The verses put such demands upon Christian husband that is impossible to see how a charge of male chauvinism could justly be made against the Bible, or how a licence to exploit women or wives could ever be claimed from such texts.

February 3rd, 2014

Yeah, girls, we’re all getting a basinful of 1st century attitudes to women! But we have to remember this was a different culture and these were the mores of the time, as Aristotle makes clear. Paul wants the ekklesiai to be seen as honest, God-fearing highly moral but loving and forgiving communities. Only thus could they preach the gospel to the pagan world around them.

February 4th, 2014

http://www.reason4living.com/articles/totw0041.htm

There are a lot of misconceptions about submission and submissive people. Before we can intelligently consider what the Bible has to say on the subject of submissive wives we need to clear these misconceptions out of our way. Let me begin with a few simple statements about the nature of submission:

Only a strong person can be submissive.
Submissiveness is not timidity, it is not servility, it is not subservience, it is not docility, it is not degrading, it is not a sign of weakness.
Submission is a sign of strength, not of weakness and a greater degree of submission requires a greater degree of strength of personal character.
Submission is an act of the will — it is the result of a choice, a decision. The act of submission can only come from a choice that a person makes. Submission cannot be enforced upon a person. Either a person submits of their own free will or they do not submit at all. Submission is a gift that one person chooses to give to another person. By contrast oppression is the act of extracting something from a person against their will. Submission and oppression are, therefore, opposite qualities of a relationship and not even remotely similar.

February 3rd, 2014

Christian marriage has certain commitments, obligations and duties which are symbolic. The roles which God has given to a Christian husband and his wife and not culturally derived, nor are they arbitrarily based. They are intended to symbolize and represent a greater, more fundamental reality. While marriage is temporal, the reality which it symbolizes is eternal. And thus we cannot understand the importance of the duties of the husband or the wife without grasping the reality which Christian marriage is to symbolically communicate. This fundamental reality which underlies and explains the attitudes and conduct of a man and his wife in marriage is the relationship of Jesus Christ to His church. This relationship was not understood clearly in Old Testament times. In Paul’s words, it was a mystery. Now, through the teaching of Paul this mystery is clear.

February 5th, 2014

Not instruction in the sense of slaves, but in respect and loyalty as their husband follow Christ.

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21 Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ. Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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5:21 — The traditional Maundy ceremony in some Christian denominations includes the washing of feet in imitation and memory of the occasions when Jesus did the same for the disciples. In John 13:14,15 Jesus says “So if I, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet” and “Very truly, I tell you, servants are not greater than their master, nor are messengers greater than the one who sent them”. The point of this is to establish the need to serve each other, man or woman. If the phrase “Be subject to” is replaced by “Serve” the message becomes clear.

We sing a hymn/song (by Graham Kendrick) at our local church called “The Servant King” with the following chorus.
This is our God, The Servant King
He calls us now to follow Him
To bring our lives as a daily offering
Of worship to The Servant King

“Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ” Considering this line as a preface for the details of the relationship between husband and wives is helpful. The way in which members of the Ekklesia are subject to each other is framed within the traditions of the community — place and times- in which they lived. The lesser stature of wives does not seem emblematic of Paul. The letter to the Ephesians may not be written by Paul. The author(s) of Ephesians may not have been able to embrace Paul’s extraordinary sense of equality.

This is the introductory, overall advice. ‘Be subject to one another.’ Don’t be proud, don’t rule. Think of Philippians 2:3, In humility count others as better than yourselves.

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February 4th, 2014

Submission here is founded in Christ not in superiority or inferiority of both parties as most churches claim today.

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February 28th, 2014

In the Church we should be subject one to another; in the world that we live in the rules are different. This simply means that we all have a role to play and that others should respect that role whatever it may be.

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February 8th, 2014

Essentially saying respect one-another.

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17 So do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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February 4th, 2014

Again Paul speaks of foolishness but this time he is against it — it is different from what he is saying — his argument is truth — other will tell foolishness.

February 4th, 2014

“The will of the Lord is” what Paul tells the Ephesians it is. They are not going to be allowed to develop an independent line of their own. That would be “foolish”.

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16 making the most of the time, because the days are evil. Ephesians 5 (NRSV) by St. Paul (Ft. Laura Nasrallah)

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March 4th, 2014

Redeeming the time is capitalizing on every opportunity.

February 7th, 2014

Here I see Paul giving us the best advise in the evil times, namely, to make the most of our time left on earth—doing good wherever we can, keeping our standards high.

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February 4th, 2014

wickedness and evil continues to increase in the world daily, it takes those who are continuously steadfast in Christ to survive the evil. Those who do not follow Christ now, will find themselves carried away by the continuous evil in the world.

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