Don’t call it an occupation! Declaration: Take Up the Baton by Michael Hardt (Ft. Antonio Negri) 1

Israel has militarily occupied Palestinian land since the 1967 Arab-Israeli war, in contravention of international law.

A Palestinian boy shows his defiance to Israeli military might.

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March 30th, 2014

Haha initially reminded me of “Don’t call it a comeback!” It’s more like a re-up..

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Democracia real ya Declaration: Take Up the Baton by Michael Hardt (Ft. Antonio Negri) 1

Real democracy now, in English.

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This is not a manifesto. Declaration: Take Up the Baton by Michael Hardt (Ft. Antonio Negri) 1

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Transnistria Phone Conversation With President Putin by President Barack Obama (Ft. President Vladimir Putin)

A tiny breakaway state between Moldova and Ukraine, seen by some to be in Putin’s sights as his next acquisition.

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De-emphasize craft? How Google Teaches by ProfPBush 4

Or might it be that the nature of the craft changes?

I’ve found that writing a piece intended for an annotatable medium allows the author a little more latitude in really elaborating upon matters. In a conventional, linearly composed piece, the writer must subject all readers, regardless of their degrees of knowledge, to an exposition. However, with annotations, the writer can include lengthy expansions upon the text without requiring all readers to go that in-depth.

There is a craft to the annotation, just as there is a craft to the composition of traditional prose.

Of course, the entry of other annotators is another matter, and this appears to be Professor Bush’s principal concern. I will optimistically turn to Foucault and Barthes here and venture a theory that the diminution of the “original writer” and the proliferation of voices within a text is in accord with our postmodern circumstance.

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Bulk metadata Statement on Section 215 Bulk Metadata Program by President Barack Obama

So what is “bulk metadata”?

Mostly simply, who is calling whom. What numbers you have called and who has called you.

Under the current program, the NSA receives the metadata from phone companies everyday. The agency keeps the data for five years and deletes it on a rolling basis. It was revealed, for instance, that Verizon must give the government information on its over 1 billion calls per day. The telecom giant is required to hand over the data on an “ongoing, daily basis.”

By law, the agency cannot mine the data until it has “reasonable and articulable suspicion” of a certain phone number’s association with a terrorist organization. But, of course, domestic Occupy-type, leftist protesters have been investigated as “terrorists,” so any leftist activist is perhaps somewhat warranted in suspecting undue surveillance of themselves or their associates.

University of Chicago professor Geoffrey Stone details the program in a helpful multi-part series on Huffington Post.

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Intelligence Committees Statement on Section 215 Bulk Metadata Program by President Barack Obama

The Senate Intelligence Committee recently found itself subject to CIA spying as the Committee neared the release of their investigation of CIA’s detention and interrogation program under President George W. Bush.

The controversy, which Feinstein charges is a violation of the Fourth Amendment, is yet another case of overreach and abuse under the Bush-Obama surveillance regimes, the very sort of abuse President Obama’s words here are supposed to mitigate.

News Genius breaks down Chairwoman Diane Feinstein’s allegations on the floor of the Senate.

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Privacy is appropriately protected Statement on Section 215 Bulk Metadata Program by President Barack Obama

While some remain unconvinced that the proposed changes will significantly curtail government spying, President Obama won over, however partially, both Edward Snowden and Glenn Greenwald, the NSA whistle blower and the reporter who broke the story in 2013.

Snowden called the changes a “turning point” in the privacy debate he ignited with this leaked NSA documents. Greenwald hailed the decision as “a potent vindication of Edward Snowden’s acts and the reporting he enabled.”

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A speech at the Department of Justice Statement on Section 215 Bulk Metadata Program by President Barack Obama

The President spoke at length in his mid-January address, defending the NSA’s spy program but vowing to scale back phone metadata collection.

I believe critics are right to point out that without proper safeguards, this type of program could be used to yield more information about our private lives, and open the door to more intrusive bulk collection programs in the future. They’re also right to point out that although the telephone bulk collection program was subject to oversight by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court and has been reauthorized repeatedly by Congress, it has never been subject to vigorous public debate.

But as Zoe Carpenter at The Nation points out, it was what Obama didn’t say in the speech which was telling:

He did not call for a full stop to the bulk collection of communication records, only a transfer of ownership. Instead, he endorsed the idea that data about millions of Americans should be stored and made available to intelligence analysts.

Read the full speech on News Genius.

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Chilling Effects Challenging the access ban in Turkey by Twitter (Ft. Vijaya Gadde)

Chilling Effects is a collaborative website comprised of a host of law school clinics (i.e., an organization in a law school that permits law students to practice law while studying), the EFF and Wendy Seltzer. The website serves as a central “clearinghouse” where those who receive cease-and-desist letters despite operating legally can submit those letters for public consumption, and to receive information about the rights their entitled to. This is increasingly necessary as companies and individuals continue to expand their global activities into new, unfamiliar legal territory.

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