We die
As your hours do, and dry
Away,
Like to the summer's rain;
Or as the pearls of morning's dew,
Ne'er to be found again.
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick

Herrick sort of comes full circle in his continued references to nature — “the summer’s rain” and “the pearls of morning’s dew.” He uses these two examples to further illustrate the short-lived quality of life and living. “Everything that is beautiful,” as the poem says, “dies.” The shortness of it all is both its greatest fault and its greatest beauty: only so much time is given, but all the more reason to appreciate that time.

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As quick a growth to meet decay,
As you, or anything.
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick

A human grows from birth so quickly only to begin death and decay, just like the daffodil, which, having bloomed into its beauty, becomes frail and rots. This is the nature of life that dominates Herrick’s perception of existence, and is why he so adamantly supports the carpe diem attitude. Life is what you’re given, so you must live it to its best end.

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We have short time to stay, as you,
We have as short a spring;
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick

These two lines serve to state the real subject of the poem. The daffodil, although given its own stanza, is really only an object of beauty that Herrick uses to form a comparison to mankind. The fleeting life and beauty of the daffodil, then, is used to compare to the equally fleeting and (to Herrick) equally beautiful life of a human.

Humans, Herrick laments, have a comparably short tenure on earth, and ought to make the best out of it. This expresses Herrick’s characteristic carpe diem attitude, which concerns itself with living each day to the fullest. The life we’re given is the greatest gift, and we should live it to the greatest extent.

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Stay, stay,
Until the hasting day
Has run
But to the even-song;
And, having pray'd together, we
Will go with you along.
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick

Herrick expresses the desire that daffodils would endure, lasting longer than “six weeks or six months,” but year-round, perhaps as long as he lives. Note the use of “we,” here in line nine and also above in line one — he’s speaking in the first person plural, which implies that he has company for whom he also speaks. This is his way of almost impressing his passion for the daffodil (the earth’s beauty) upon a group, presumably of which the reader is a part. It also serves to set up a comparison that Herrick will fulfill in the second stanza: the life of man to the life of the daffodil.

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Fair Daffodils, we weep to see
You haste away so soon;
As yet the early-rising sun
Has not attain'd his noon.
To Daffodils by Robert Herrick

Beauty, to Herrick, is in the world, and it is only temporary. To describe this sentiment, he uses the daffodil:

The “Fair Daffodils” don’t last very long, anywhere from six weeks to six months, although in Herrick’s native England it’s like as not closer to the former. To Herrick, the death of this beauty deserves mourning.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dpDMBEVmRac

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Whether both th' Indias of spice and mine
Be where thou left'st them, or lie here with me.
The Sun Rising by John Donne

Donne’s beloved possesses a beauty of great value — and it’s all his. To convey this message, Donne compares her to the “Indias of spice (East Indies) and mine ("gold,” West Indies),“ both of which were contemporary objects of significant wealth. Donne requests that the sun looks to the earth to see if these two things are where they were when the sun set — India and the Caribbean, respectively — or if they lie instead next to Donne, in his bed.

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Life's a bitch and she pussy pop, know why? Cause I got her open
That pussy soaking, fuck is you promoting?
LVL by A$AP Rocky

Rocky makes a reference to a renowned Nas track (can you guess which?) with the phrase Nasty himself (well, actually, AZ… But it’s on Nas’s track) popularized: life’s a bitch.

Aesop Rock (note: not A$AP Rocky — Aesop Rock is his predecessor and raps in a manner far different from Rocky’s… they actually met for the first time, not too long ago.) argues that life isn’t riddled with hardships and nothing but a difficulty, but instead that life is a beautiful woman — something to be cherished and appreciated in his track, “Daylight”:

You only call her a bitch because she won’t let you get that pussy

Flacko, however, calls life a bitch, and is still getting pussy. This line serves as an illumination both of Rocky’s characteristically misogynistic perception of females as well as his optimistic, confident approach to life, despite its trials: things are going well for him, to say the very least. His use of “open” indicates a positive view of something so difficult. Life is open for Rocky, full of options, opportunities, and potential.

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But that I would not lose her sight so long. The Sun Rising by John Donne

In closing his eyes, Donne could shut out the Sun — which, although strong, could be eclipsed by a “wink.” However, should he close his eyes for so long, he would lose sight of his beloved, and that would be a torturous, fruitless endeavor for this narrator, who is so enamored with the object of his love.

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Why dost thou thus,
Through windows, and through curtains, call on us?
Must to thy motions lovers' seasons run?
The Sun Rising by John Donne

Donne is annoyed that this foolish, unruly Sun must end the night and thus his amorous activities with his beloved. The Sun finds itself peaking through curtains, its light penetrating these feeble barriers placed to elongate the image of night, and so finally killing night and Donne’s mood. Why, Donne wonders, must the Sun dictate time? Why do lovers, or humans in general, have to be governed by its rise and fall? The question isn’t solely rhetorical, either — rather, Donne asks the reader, “What do you think? Should time dictate our lives?”

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I am a god I Am a God by Kanye West

Kanye discusses this track during his interview with Zane Lowe for BBC Radio 1, during which he says that this song prompted reactions like: “‘I Am a God’? Who does he think he is?,” to which Kanye responds, “I just told you who I thought I was! A god! That’s who I think I am.”

He continues to ask, “Would it have been better if I had a song that said I was a ‘gangsta’? Or if I had a song that said I was a ‘pimp’? All those colors and patinas fight better on a person like me, right? But to say you are a god, especially when you got shipped over to the country you’re in, and your last name is a slave owner’s… How could you say that?”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_detailpage&v=GIfUmGxSgpY#t=729

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