Rolled up a car full of soldiers
Club owners know that I'm bout it
100 Bottles by Wiz Khalifa (Ft. Problem)

Wiz could be dropping a double meaning:

  1. Rolling up in a car full of soldiers as in smoking in a full car…

  2. The obvious, rolling up to the club in a full car.

He also doesn’t fail to reference an older song of his, Roll Up

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Joint full of bomb, bout to explode (tweak)
Molly got me on another zip-code
100 Bottles by Wiz Khalifa (Ft. Problem)

His joint is chock-full of high quality Marijuana, that has him so high he feels his head might pop.

Molly, the nickname for the purest form of the drug, Ecstasy, has him tripping so far off, he feels as if he’s in literally in another state.

This means two things:

  1. A literal geological State as in FL, WV, CT, etc.
  2. A different psychological mindstate.

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Smokin just like a Jamaican 100 Bottles by Wiz Khalifa (Ft. Problem)

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Gettin' money conversations 100 Bottles by Wiz Khalifa (Ft. Problem)

Literally:

Money talks

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A man wouldn't to sing to di Almighty ah rassclad. Him love him woman more than the creator who create the sun the moon and the bombaclat star. I sick and tired ah hearing that bomba-bloodclat.. Seen? New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

Peter is showing contrast: He’s dumbfounded to the fact that men rather sing to women rather than to the Creator. He’s more concerned with their lack of priorities, while claiming to be Rasta.

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People are sick and tired of hearing bombaclat 'get down shake your fuckin' booty.' People are sick of hearing 'Darlin' I bloodclat love you.' You turn on the fuckin' radio twenty-four bombaclat hours a day you hear 'Darlin' I love you.' New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

We can all sympathize: How many times have you turned on the radio and let out a loud, disappointed sigh at the plastic-wrapped “love songs” that dominate the airwaves?

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And that not goin' change me. Seen? Because I am going to kill the fuckery out there, and people is going to be in demand for the truth. New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

Whether or not he’s accepted on a global scale for his music doesn’t matter; he plans to reveal truth, and there are always people searching for truth.

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And all because you know why? I am not singing 'Darling I bloodclat love you, and come shake your ass and I'll swim the ocean and climb the mountain.' Seen? New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

His “lack of success”, or good favor with his record label stems from his decision not to write the substance-less songs people love to hear.

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I know that. But it's not a Michael Jackson bombaclat element, and not a likkle um, wha di next one name? Prince element, and dem kinda likkle big back bombaclat element. It's too.. Wha ya say? It too black fi dem? It's that what I want to know.. If it too bombaclat black fi dem. Or it too right fi dem? Cause it not wrong. People don't want wrong tings. New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

Tosh is aware that his video is in demand. He’s also aware of the true nature of the “beast” (read: music industry) — which basically is; “Conform and get paid little, or don’t and get paid nothing.”

He is also saying that the music he makes isn’t like “Prince” or “Michael Jackson” and that the music industry seems to find his music “too black”, and if it isn’t that peter is wondering what it could be.

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I have a comment regarding the video, as well as the demand. When I went to buy my copy of the video they told me at the store that they had many, many requests for that video at that time. Just so the record company should know - that video is in demand. New York Interview - 1986 by Peter Tosh

The interviewer (also a fan) is shedding light from a consumer perspective. The labels had been slacking on promotion and sales for a video of Peter’s — because of what they perceived to be a “lack of demand.” (Perhaps that’s just the excuse they gave Tosh.)

She’s letting Tosh (and indirectly the label) know that the video is in fact, in demand, and that if it’s a corporate decision based on money, that selling is in their favor.

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