It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. I Have A Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr

King compares the intensity of the coloreds' upcoming push for equality to the heat of a very hot summer, but says that, if equality is achieved, then the bliss that follows will be comparable to a fair autumn after the aforementioned hot summer.

The use of the seasons here is pretty powerful, considering that summer is usually considered the season of passion and autumn as the season of peace and change.

“Sweltering summer of the Negro’s legitimate discontent” is a reference to the opening lines of Shakespeare’s Richard III.

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-- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. I Have A Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr

Continuing the check metaphor, Martin hopes that his actions will not make the black race rich, necessarily, as a real check would; but rather give the coloreds the rights which were guaranteed to ALL American citizens in the Declaration of Independence.

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We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. I Have A Dream by Martin Luther King, Jr

Both black and white citizens had certainly pushed for racial equality before, but politicians and leaders had always disregarded these requests, insisting that it would happen later. Here King urges leaders to take it upon themselves to make the change happen now, not to put it off further.

Many white liberals in King’s day, including Eleanor Roosevelt, advocated a gradualist approach. (“go slow doesn’t mean, don’t go”). King’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail,” which he wrote approximately five months before delivering this speech, was a response to gradualism—he was responding to an open letter written by clergymen who in fact considered themselves pro-civil rights, but who also advocated the “go slow, don’t make waves, wait” approach. From their letter, titled “A Call For Unity”:

“We recognize the natural impatience of people who feel that their hopes are slow in being realized. But we are convinced that these demonstrations are unwise and untimely.”

By calling gradualism a drug, King was doing at least two things. He was 1) arguing that gradualism stupefied white liberals, in particular, like a drug, allowing them to feel good about supporting civil rights even as they did nothing to advance it. Such good feelings were therefore delusional, as hollow as a drug high. And 2) he was urging African-Americans to steer clear of gradualism in the same way one might say “don’t drink the Kool-Aid” today — that is, don’t buy into stupefying, mind-controlling beliefs.

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Marinating in Satan's sweat, take a sip of this holy water Sacrilegious by ScHoolboy Q

He tries to stay good, but with all the evil surrounding him, he can’t help but be affected by it.

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Survival my main concern Sacrilegious by ScHoolboy Q

People get killed everyday for no reason, so the main reason that people do the bad that they do is for them to survive. Ironically, while trying to sustain their own lives, they jeopardize others' lives

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Huddles, steady find a plan, spread evil beyond the land
As I clench down upon this trigger,
Sacrilegious by ScHoolboy Q

As he tries to find something to make of his life, he fills up the time with the evils of gangbanging

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Hoodies and weaponry
Naïve to being free, locked up, we chasing keys
Sacrilegious by ScHoolboy Q

Many kids these days think that being “free” means to live their lives the way they want (often through selling drugs, being shady with weapons, etc.). What they don’t understand is that, by doing these things, they are taking away their own freedom, because they are leading themselves to jail.

This line is also about more than just societal freedom vs. jail, though. “Keys” is a homophone of ki’s, as in kilos of drugs, like crack. The lifestyle of chasing the dream of moving these quantities of drugs as a dealer means you’re already “locked up” because your actions are set within a determinate course. We are “naïve to being free” in this sense because we do not even ACKNOWLEDGE our existential freedom — that we are absolutely free — because we are pursuing paths given to us that necessarily preclude other avenues being taken. We think we have freedom within this lifestyle, but it is ironically an impingement on freedom.

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May your glass never reach half-empty, DC Or Nothing by Wale

‘Le hopes you never have to ask yourself

Is the glass half empty or half full

Because he wants you to stay above the mid-way mark.

To say a glass is half empty is usually a pessimistic way of looking at life, Wale here is saying don’t look at your life in a bad way.

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May you see your dreams allowed, before you see them from a cloud DC Or Nothing by Wale

Before your death, live out your dreams.

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Ain’t nobody here leading, it’s way too easy to follow DC Or Nothing by Wale

Although the world’s leaders preside in D.C., no good is leading the young kids in the ghetto, so they follow whatever is most available, usually a bad influence.

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