Let every soldier hew him down a bough
And bear't before him: thereby shall we shadow
The numbers of our host and make discovery
Err in report of us.
Macbeth Act 5 Scene 4 by William Shakespeare

A tricky military maneuver that could have came straight out of Sun Tzu’s Art of War. The soldiers will assist in waging a misinformation campaign against Macbeth by using tree branches with leafs (boughs) to hide their numbers from the enemy forces.

This also fulfills the witches' prophecy by LITERALLY bringing Birnam Wood to Dunsinane. #CLEVER

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Were I from Dunsinane away and clear,
Profit again should hardly draw me here.
Macbeth Act 5 Scene 3 by William Shakespeare

I’m never coming back to this circus!

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There is ten thousand-- Macbeth Act 5 Scene 3 by William Shakespeare

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Near Birnam wood Macbeth Act 5 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

The witches' prophecy begins to unfold…

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As much as an apple doth an oyster,
and all one.
Taming of the Shrew Act 4 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

vs

NO COMPARISON

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Ay, sir, in Pisa have I often been Taming of the Shrew Act 4 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Home of the famous Leaning Tower

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And so to Tripoli Taming of the Shrew Act 4 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

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And as far as Rome; Taming of the Shrew Act 4 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

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The Art to Love. Taming of the Shrew Act 4 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

The Ars amatoria (English: The Art of Love) is an instructional book series elegy in three books by Ancient Roman poet Ovid. It was written in 2 AD. It is about teaching basic Gentlemanly male and female relationship skills and techniques.

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Thou hast tamed a curst shrew. Taming of the Shrew Act 5 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

This guy did what others could not — locked down the feistiest woman in town!

damn

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