AND INDIVIDUAL FREEDOM Amendment 64 by The People of the State of Colorado

A victimless crime is not a crime

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ENHANCING REVENUE FOR PUBLIC PURPOSES Amendment 64 by The People of the State of Colorado

The tax revenue generated by legalization and regulation of Marijuana could be between $5 and $22 million.

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(I) INDIVIDUALS WILL HAVE TO SHOW PROOF OF AGE BEFORE PURCHASING MARIJUANA; Amendment 64 by The People of the State of Colorado

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TAXED IN A MANNER SIMILAR TO ALCOHOL. Amendment 64 by The People of the State of Colorado

Alcohol is taxed at 2.9% in the state of Colorado.

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Personal use and regulation of marijuana Amendment 64 by The People of the State of Colorado

A.K.A. Legalization

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If you really want to hear about it, the first thing you'll probably want to know is where I was born, an what my lousy childhood was like, and how my parents were occupied and all before they had me, and all that David Copperfield kind of crap The Catcher in the Rye (Chap. 1) by J.D. Salinger

J.D. Salinger hasn’t even finished the first sentence and he’s already characterizing Holden Caulfield (the narrator) as

A bit self-absorbed

As if I really want to hear about it, Holden.

Isolated from his family

Specifically his parents (“occupied and all”), possibly due to his “lousy childhood.” Also, the reference to the Charles Dickens character David Copperfield of the near eponymous novel supports this claim (David Copperfield was sent away from home to a boarding school by his mom and step-dad. Holden also was sent to a boarding school away from home).

Intelligent

The offhand allusion to David Copperfield speaks for itself.

A potty mouth

Crap. The frequent swearing in the novel has placed it consistently among the most banned books in American school libraries.

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“Home Colonies”, Communist Manifesto (Chap. 3: "Socialist and Communist Literature Part 3: Critical-Utopian Socialism and Communism") by Karl Marx (Ft. Friedrich Engels)

“Home Colonies” were what Owen called his Communist model societies.“[Note by Engels to the German edition of 1890.]

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Setting up a “Little Icaria” Communist Manifesto (Chap. 3: "Socialist and Communist Literature Part 3: Critical-Utopian Socialism and Communism") by Karl Marx (Ft. Friedrich Engels)

“ Phalanstéres were Socialist colonies on the plan of Charles Fourier; Icaria was the name given by Cabet to his Utopia and, later on, to his American Communist colony.” [Note by Engels to the English edition of 1888.]

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This foul and enervating literature Communist Manifesto (Chap. 3: "Socialist and Communist Literature Part 1: Reactionary Socialism") by Karl Marx (Ft. Friedrich Engels)

“The revolutionary storm of 1848 swept away this whole shabby tendency and cured its protagonists of the desire to dabble in socialism. The chief representative and classical type of this tendency is Mr Karl Gruen.” [Note by Engels to the German edition of 1890.]

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Beetroot-sugar, and potato spirits Communist Manifesto (Chap. 3: "Socialist and Communist Literature Part 1: Reactionary Socialism") by Karl Marx (Ft. Friedrich Engels)

“This applies chiefly to Germany, where the landed aristocracy and squirearchy have large portions of their estates cultivated for their own account by stewards, and are, moreover, extensive beetroot-sugar manufacturers and distillers of potato spirits. The wealthier British aristocracy are, as yet, rather above that; but they, too, know how to make up for declining rents by lending their names to floaters or more or less shady joint-stock companies.” [Note by Engels to the English edition of 1888.]

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