The Sermon on the Mount Suggested Readings of the Bible by Poetry Genius Editors

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The Ten Commandments Suggested Readings of the Bible by Poetry Genius Editors

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Look like a better happier St. Sebastian Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

Sebastian is a Christian saint and martyr. In art and literature he’s almost always depicted tied up and shot through with arrows, but that isn’t actually the way he died. Instead, he was rescued by Irene of Rome only to get clubbed to death after criticizing the Roman emperor. Rough.

Another writer fascinated with the martyrdom of St. Sebastian was the American poet Hart Crane. He adapted the image of the arrow-piercing to a Native American context in the poem “The Dance,” from his epic work The Bridge:

And buzzard-circleted, screamed from the stake;
I could not pick the arrows from my side.
Wrapped in that fire, I saw more escorts wake—
Flickering, sprint up the hill groins like a tide.

Another meaning of this reference is that St. Sebastian is often known as the saint of homosexuality. This is also an extension of the gay symbolism throughout: the city of San Sebastian, “the secrecy of our smiles.” In addition, St. Sebastian, as noted above, is a symbol of martyrdom—in this context due to sexuality. O'Hara hopes that he and his love, Vincent Warren, will be happier and suffer less than St. Sebastian.

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Like a tree breathing through its spectacles Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

A whimsical, deliberately strange line.

One interpretation may be that a tree “breathes” through its leaves as it takes in carbon dioxide and releases oxygen. Also, both spectacles and leaves are shiny and reflective in sunlight. Both the narrator and the “you” in the poem are drifting in the warmth of the sunlight like the leaves swaying in the wind.

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Nude Descending a Staircase Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

This painting by Duchamp was his first to spur real controversy as it was an early hint at Dadaism that is to manifest soon after it’s painting in 1912. This movement was similar to the post-modernists in literature with their congruency in the denouncing of decadence and emphasis on reality. O'Hara, curating the MOMA, was heavily influenced by these movements.

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March 27th, 2013

By Marcel Duchamp

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Frick Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

Interestingly,The Frick Museum is a rival museum to the Museum of Modern Art, where O'Hara worked. Of course, pursuant to the theme in this poem, the Frick is mentioned to show that O'Hara is above the ostentatious act of jealousy and petty contempt for a rival. Art is art is life and that’s what O'Hara cares about.

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Polish Rider Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

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Or for that matter Marino Marini Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

Marino Marini was an Italian sculptor. His name is even alliteration, assonance and consonance! Probably the most poetic name since William Carlos Williams… but that’s just the same name used twice.

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When he didn’t pick the rider as carefully
as the horse
Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

Marini created several works that depicted riders on horses. In each sculpture, it’s typical that there is more detail and effort put into the horse than the rider. The purpose of the poem is to focus on the little things in life. In the alluded to work by Marini, one can assume the horse is the focus, thus its emphasis is created by the lack of detail and intention of the rider. “The horse” is enjambed to mimic Marini’s effect of accentuating the horse.

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Bayonne Having A Coke With You by Frank O'Hara

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