And he's not gonna come back on a Saturday. Everybody's busy! Doing chores, working the loom, trimming their beards. The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

The Saturday after Good Friday and before Easter Sunday is called Holy Saturday. Although this would not historically be the case in the time of Jesus, people do in fact use that particular Saturday to do chores and clean up before the big Easter Sunday festivities.

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And FYI, that's when he invented the high five. The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

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Barney, don't do this. Not with Jesus. The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

In many episodes of How I Met Your Mother, Barney gives fake history lessons to make a point. This would definitely be one of them and Marsall’s warning does not seem to stop him.

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Jesus. The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

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Barney, that rule is completely played out. Girls know exactly what you're doing. Hey! I gotta new rule. It's kinda crazy, but I call it, "You like her, you call her." The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

Many dating sites like to tell men to break the three days rule because it is such an outdated rule. Also, Ted is well known to tell a girl how he feels on the first date.

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Dude you can't call her. You have to wait three days to call a woman. That's the rule The Three Days Rule by How I Met Your Mother

Typically, the unwritten rule is that a man needs to wait three days before calling a woman after a first date to not seem over eager, and also to pique interest from the lack of communication,

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Hearts with one purpose alone Easter 1916 by William Butler Yeats

This stanza highlights the paradoxical way in which these martyrs have changed by becoming unchanging. Their singular purpose is as unchanging as stone. He juxtaposes images that are always changing “minute by minute” with the stone.

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This other his helper and friend
Was coming into his force;
He might have won fame in the end,
So sensitive his nature seemed,
So daring and sweet his thought.
Easter 1916 by William Butler Yeats

Thomas MacDonagh studied the Irish language and met his fellow revolutionary, Patrick Pearse, through his involvement with the Gaelic League.

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This man had kept a school
And rode our wingèd horse;
Easter 1916 by William Butler Yeats

“This man”, Patrick Pearse, was an Irish teacher and one of the leaders of the Easter Rising. A “winged horse” refers to a Pegasus which is sometimes refered to as a symbol of wisdom and poetry. Yeats is tipping his hat towards Pearse as a skilled writer.

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That woman's days were spent
In ignorant good-will,
Her nights in argument
Until her voice grew shrill.
What voice more sweet than hers
When, young and beautiful,
She rode to harriers?
Easter 1916 by William Butler Yeats

These lines are in reference to Constance Markievicz who took part in the Easter Rising with the Irish Citizen Army.

She spoke loftily about independence, but until the uprising, it was just ignorant good-will.

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