Call her one, me another fly, The Canonization by John Donne

We are like two flies who move around each other. Donne’s lines here make reference to The Flea, in which he elevates sex and love by imagining his and his partner’s blood mixing in the body of a flea

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Or chide my palsy, or my gout ;
My five gray hairs, or ruin'd fortune flout ;
The Canonization by John Donne

These first three lines mean “For God’s sake keep silent, and allow me to love, or criticize(chide) my paralysis(palsy) instead or my gout(a disease, deposition of chalk stones in small bones of a human body), or mock my five grey hairs- meaning my old age, laziness or my lack of riches.

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Alas ! alas ! who's injured by my love?
What merchant's ships have my sighs drown'd?
Who says my tears have overflow'd his ground?
When did my colds a forward spring remove?
The Canonization by John Donne

We’re not hurting anyone by loving each other

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November 13th, 2013

poet says,“has my love injured anyone? do my sighs drown the merchants’s ships? and who says my tears of love have flooded his land? did my cold chills prevent an early spring?

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For God's sake hold your tongue The Canonization by John Donne

Seriously, shut up

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This flea is you and I The Flea by John Donne

That’s kind of insulting, isn’t it?

Throughout the poem, Donne is telling the girl how insignificant her chastity is in order to get her to sleep with him

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Though parents grudge, and you, The Flea by John Donne

“Your parents hate me, you hate me…but let’s not let that get in our way”

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'Tis true; then learn how false fears be;
Just so much honour, when thou yield'st to me,
Will waste, as this flea's death took life from thee.
The Flea by John Donne

Killing the flea, that miniature “marriage temple,” made no difference whatsoever. Nor will it make any difference if she sleeps with him!

The logic is slippery here, but Donne was so sexy I bet this worked a lot.

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Thou
Find'st not thyself nor me the weaker now.
The Flea by John Donne

Even though she’s shed her own blood, and his, by killing the flea, neither one is suffering a loss of strength.

Similarly, they won’t be any weaker after orgasm, which was often referred to as a “death” (le petit mort, the little death).

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Wherein could this flea guilty be,
Except in that drop which it suck'd from thee?
The Flea by John Donne

Well…Donne was making that drop sound pretty important! And now he’s discounting it

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Cruel and sudden, hast thou since
Purpled thy nail in blood of innocence?
The Flea by John Donne

Somewhere between stanzas 2 & 3, the lady has squished the bug

Women were usually called cruel for not sleeping with guys

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