Thus, while in life the great whale's body may have been a real terror to his foes, in his death his ghost becomes a powerless panic to a world.

Are you a believer in ghosts, my friend?
Moby-Dick (Chap. 69: The Funeral) by Herman Melville

Ghosts are real when you think of them as the resonances of departed living things.

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Nor is this the end. Desecrated as the body is, a vengeful ghost survives and hovers over it to scare. Espied by some timid man-of-war or blundering discovery-vessel from afar, when the distance obscuring the swarming fowls, nevertheless still shows the white mass floating in the sun, and the white spray heaving high against it; straightway the whale's unharming corpse, with trembling fingers is set down in the log—SHOALS, ROCKS, AND BREAKERS HEREABOUTS: BEWARE! And for years afterwards, perhaps, ships shun the place; leaping over it as silly sheep leap over a vacuum, because their leader originally leaped there when a stick was held. There's your law of precedents; there's your utility of traditions; there's the story of your obstinate survival of old beliefs never bottomed on the earth, and now not even hovering in the air! There's orthodoxy! Moby-Dick (Chap. 69: The Funeral) by Herman Melville

Like the sharks in chapter 66, this whale has a second act on earth after its heart and brain have been cut out of its body. Its corpse is so large that it will be mistaken for hazards. The dead whale will put fear in their hearts and change the course of maritime journeys for years. If a dead whale can exact such vengeance, what of the unkillable Moby Dick?

Looking at this photo of a dead sperm whale adrift, it’s easy to see how it’s mass could be mistaken for a shoal or a group of rocks.

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Ween Moby-Dick (Chap. 69: The Funeral) by Herman Melville

suppose, think, figure, etc.

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But yes, yes we are. "On Smarm," Excerpt by Tom Scocca

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Well, no. "On Smarm," Excerpt by Tom Scocca

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Are you serious? the commenters write. Is this serious? On Twitter, the right-thinking commenters pass the links around: Seriously? "On Smarm," Excerpt by Tom Scocca

The GOP corrected itself 3 hours after crediting Rosa Parks for ending racism

So what’s the big fuss? Simple slip of the tongue.

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It does seem to me, that herein we see the rare virtue of a strong individual vitality, and the rare virtue of thick walls, and the rare virtue of interior spaciousness. Oh, man! admire and model thyself after the whale! Do thou, too, remain warm among ice. Do thou, too, live in this world without being of it. Be cool at the equator; keep thy blood fluid at the Pole. Like the great dome of St. Peter's, and like the great whale, retain, O man! in all seasons a temperature of thine own.

But how easy and how hopeless to teach these fine things! Of erections, how few are domed like St. Peter's! of creatures, how few vast as the whale!
Moby-Dick (Chap. 68: The Blanket) by Herman Melville

This is a metaphor right? Cool.

Yes actually, Ishmael is telling us to remain cool. Or warm. Just regulate yourself and don’t let your surroundings get the best of you.

The best way to ensure that you do so is to be large like St. Peter’s Basilica, which has a very spacious interior afforded by that architectural marvel the dome. In other words, cultivate a deep and vast internal life.

St Peter’s Basilica

does indeed have a large and beautiful interior life

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But more surprising is it to know, as has been proved by experiment, that the blood of a Polar whale is warmer than that of a Borneo negro in summer Moby-Dick (Chap. 68: The Blanket) by Herman Melville

Shades of Mengale…it’s safe to say that this was not an ethical experiment.

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But no more of this Moby-Dick (Chap. 68: The Blanket) by Herman Melville

Ishmael has made a very flimsy case for why a whale’s skin is not properly it’s skin. But okay.

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For it were simply ridiculous to say, that the proper skin of the tremendous whale is thinner and more tender than the skin of a new-born child. Moby-Dick (Chap. 68: The Blanket) by Herman Melville

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