Gomorrah? Moby-Dick (Chap. 2: The Carpet-Bag) by Herman Melville

Ishmael is now in the seedier part of town. In the Old Testament, Sodom and Gomorrah were cities that God destroyed for being havens of vice.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

"The Crossed Harpoons" Moby-Dick (Chap. 2: The Carpet-Bag) by Herman Melville

The names for beach properties were as horrible in the 19th century as they are today.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Be sure to inquire the price, and don't be too particular Moby-Dick (Chap. 2: The Carpet-Bag) by Herman Melville

But beware the bed bugs…

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Not ignoring what is good, I am quick to perceive a horror, and could still be social with it—would they let me—since it is but well to be on friendly terms with all the inmates of the place one lodges in. Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

"WHALING VOYAGE BY ONE ISHMAEL Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

Ismael is making fun of himself, and of people in general: we imagine the world revolves around us, and that our personal fate is of great consequence.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Two orchard thieves Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

Adam and Eve are the orchard thieves.

It’s nice of Melville to make them equally culpable here. Usually Eve gets blamed for being smarter/more interesting than her beefcake husband.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Either in a physical or metaphysical point of view, that is; and so the universal thump is passed round, and all hands should rub each other's shoulder-blades, and be content. Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Who ain't a slave? Tell me that. Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

Actual slaves (Moby Dick was first published in 1851, well before the end of legal slavery in the United States) would probably have been like, “Well, you for one, Mr. Ishmael.”

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

me
March 16th, 2014

“We buy our way out of jail, but we can’t buy freedom”– Ye

Ethan
February 5th, 2014

Today, it gives the impression that the message is that although we are free, there are traces/vestiges of slavery in modern society, to my money.

December 27th, 2013

Good point. Melville was known to let Ishmael misspeak certain facts to give the narrator a more human quality. This pretense obscures instances (possibly like this one) when Melville may have revealed his own blunders and/or biases.

Add a suggestion

Spar to spar Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

A spar is any wooden or metal pole used to support sails or rigging.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

But here is an artist. Moby-Dick (Chap. 1: Loomings) by Herman Melville

“Here I am"
—Herman Melville

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +