But this did by no means prevent all communications. Preserving an interval of some few yards between itself and the ship, the Jeroboam's boat by the occasional use of its oars contrived to keep parallel to the Pequod, as she heavily forged through the sea (for by this time it blew very fresh), with her main-topsail aback; though, indeed, at times by the sudden onset of a large rolling wave, the boat would be pushed some way ahead; but would be soon skilfully brought to her proper bearings again. Moby-Dick (Chap. 71: Jeroboam's Story) by Herman Melville

It is difficult to aligning two huge ships on the open ocean in order to carry on a shouted conversation back and forth. But Ahab is greedy for news of the White Whale, so he’s willing to put up with the inconvenience. The constant interruptions in dialogue caused by the unusual arrangement becomes something of a comedic device that reminds us that human intent does not control the world—the wind and water have no interest in Ahab’s conversation with the Pequod, and they continue their usual movements without concern for the trouble they are causing.

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"I fear not thy epidemic, man," said Ahab from the bulwarks, to Captain Mayhew, who stood in the boat's stern; "come on board." Moby-Dick (Chap. 71: Jeroboam's Story) by Herman Melville

As a man possessed with a singular, all-consuming purpose in life (killing Moby Dick), Ahab is not bothered by mortal concerns like disease.

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Archangel Gabriel Moby-Dick (Chap. 71: Jeroboam's Story) by Herman Melville

The archangel Gabriel is God’s favorite messenger. Most famously, he announced the conception and birth of Jesus Christ to the Virgin Mary, and event known as “the annunciation”.

In John Collier’s “The Annunciation,” Mary is depicted as a suburban school girl with knobby knees hiding her face in a book. Gabriel has probably not yet announced her impending pregnancy. What will her parents think?

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April 10th, 2014

As he is deluding that he is the archangel Gabriel, an agent of god, Captain Ahab has the madness of destroying the agents of god that impair his life by destroying Moby Dick.

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Announcing the speedy opening of the seventh vial, which he carried in his vest-pocket Moby-Dick (Chap. 71: Jeroboam's Story) by Herman Melville

In Revelations 16:17, the opening of the seventh vial unleashes an epic earthquake and hailstorm upon the earth. That this man carries the seventh vial in his breast pocket makes him something of a suicide bomber.

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Jeroboam of Nantucket Moby-Dick (Chap. 71: Jeroboam's Story) by Herman Melville

Jeroboam was king of Israel from 931-910 BC. He is known as the man who lead “Israel to sin” because he erected golden calves for his people to worship, which is a pretty big no no for the God of Israel.

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Even if you live in Brooklyn Nobody's Daughter, by Ross Douthat by Mallory Ortberg

Brooklyn Brooklyn Brooklyn. You are not so much a place as an idea. An idea that smells of sex.

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As when the novelist Benjamin Kunkel told Traister that the solution was “some sort of a sexual strike against just such men.” Nobody's Daughter, by Ross Douthat by Mallory Ortberg

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Lurking in Waldman’s novel, Nobody's Daughter, by Ross Douthat by Mallory Ortberg

Douthat’s column is based on questionable new (and questionably new) social scientific research, his fear of sex in general, and of sex among highly educated young people like himself, in specific. The title character in Adelle Waldman’s novel, “The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.” represents someone just like Douthat—young, well-intentioned, smart…except he gets laid a bit and this is fucking awful (because women have no agency and are therefore simply victims of his penis).

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And no matter what the next study says about your likelihood of actually turning into a Republican, once you’ve flirted with that insight, you’ve tiptoed a little closer to something that might be described as social conservatism. The Daughter Theory by Ross Douthat

No matter what you think of this article, you have to read Mallory Ortberg’s brilliant response

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Ahem, Lena Dunham, ahem The Daughter Theory by Ross Douthat

I would pay a lot of money to watch Lena Dunham slowing separate Douthat’s scrotum from his body with a single yard of dental floss. Something tells me Douthat would too.

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