And the death just avoided, was of that very character which I had regarded as fabulous and frivolous in the tales respecting the Inquisition. The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

Poe’s narrator had thought the rumors of grisly horrors in the Inquisition were exaggerated or false—

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vt0Y39eMvpI

—because NOBODY EXPECTS THE SPANISH INQUISITION!

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Impia tortorum longos hic turba furores
Sanguinis innocui, non satiata, aluit.
Sospite nunc patria, fracto nunc funeris antro,
Mors ubi dira fuit vita salusque patent.
The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

Translation/footnote from Tales of Horror and Suspense (Courier Dover Publications, 2003):

‘Here an unholy mob of torturers with an insatiable thirst for innocent blood, once fed their long frenzy. Now our homeland is safe, the funereal cave destroyed, and life and health appear where dreadful death once was.’ The Jacobins were terrorists during the 1789 French Revolution.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Such a supposition, notwithstanding what we read in fiction, is altogether inconsistent with real existence; The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

Such as Poe’s own fiction? His story “The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar,” for example, concerns a man hypnotized on the verge of death and consequently able to communicate from a “mesmeric state” in the afterlife. The story was thought by some readers to be a factual account until Poe admitted it was fiction.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

To thy high requiem become a sod. Ode to a Nightingale by John Keats

A requiem is a musical composition associated with funerals. The Requièm Mass in D minor by Mozart is perhaps the most popular example of such a composition.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zi8vJ_lMxQI

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

And then there stole into my fancy, like a rich musical note, the thought of what sweet rest there must be in the grave. The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

cf. John Keats, “Ode to a Nightingale” (1819):

Now more than ever seems it rich to die,
To cease upon the midnight with no pain,
While thou art pouring forth thy soul abroad
In such an ecstasy!

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

I was sick—sick unto death with that long agony; The Pit and the Pendulum by Edgar Allan Poe

cf. John 11:1-4:

John 11:1: Now a certain man was sick, named Lazarus, of Bethany, the town of Mary and her sister Martha.
John 11:2: (It was that Mary which anointed the Lord with ointment, and wiped his feet with her hair, whose brother Lazarus was sick.)
John 11:3: Therefore his sisters sent unto him, saying, Lord, behold, he whom thou lovest is sick.
John 11:4: When Jesus heard that, he said, This sickness is not unto death, but for the glory of God, that the Son of God might be glorified thereby.

In 1849, seven years after the publication of “The Pit and the Pendulum,” Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard alluded to this passage in the title of his classic book about spiritual despair: The Sickness Unto Death.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere The Second Coming by William Butler Yeats

Since the poem was written in 1919, Yeats is thinking here, undoubtedly, of the mass bloodshed caused by World War I (1914-18).

The entire continent lost its innocence to the horrendous violence and destruction of that war — unprecedented owing to advances in military technology leading to a grinding stalemate on the West Front, and wholesale slaughter on the East.

The total casualties included over 10 million military personnel and 7 million civilians, with a further 20 million wounded (many of whom lived the rest of their lives horrifically crippled). Unlike in 19th-century wars, the majority (2/3) of deaths were due to battle; previously the majority died due to disease.

Yeats may also have in mind the Russian Revolution of 1917, the recently commenced Irish War of Independence in his native country, and/or other clashes and uprisings in Europe during that turbulent decade.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Redemptive sense García Márquez, Genius, and Mastery by Austin Allen (Ft. Perfectrhyme) 7

Not redemptive for us individually, but for life in general, which goes on in spite of everything.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

The word "genius" cropped up often in obituaries for the late Steve Jobs, García Márquez, Genius, and Mastery by Austin Allen (Ft. Perfectrhyme) 7

Including in this New York Times piece by his biographer Walter Isaacson.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Along with the previously all-but-ignored literature of his country and region García Márquez, Genius, and Mastery by Austin Allen (Ft. Perfectrhyme) 7

García Márquez was from Colombia. The success of One Hundred Years of Solitude is often credited with ushering in the “Latin American Boom” in literature during the ‘70s and '80s.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.