“My wet nurse A Game of Thrones (Prologue) by George R. R. Martin (Ft. George R. R. Martin)

A wet nurse is a woman who breast-feeds another’s child when the child’s mother is unwilling or unable to do so.

The status of wet nursing has varied tremendously across times and cultures. In the contemporary U.S., for example, it carries a slight stigma, whereas for much of European history the opposite (breast-feeding one’s own baby) carried a stigma, in particular among the upper classes, for whom it was a marker of poverty.

One of the most famous wet nurses in literature is Juliet’s Nurse in Romeo and Juliet.

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“My mother told me that dead men sing no songs,” he put in. A Game of Thrones (Prologue) by George R. R. Martin (Ft. George R. R. Martin)

A variation on a common proverb, most often phrased as “Dead men tell no tales” and frequently associated with pirates, in part due to its use on Disneyland’s “Pirates of the Caribbean” ride:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2shuyGrRL0

The fifth installment in Disney’s Pirates of the Caribbean film series is subtitled “Dead Men Tell No Tales.”

The gist of the expression is that the dead can’t tell secrets or hurt us in any way. Another version appears in Robert Louis Stevenson’s pirate novel Treasure Island: “Dead men don’t bite.”

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But every hour is saved
From that eternal silence,
Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

“Eternal silence” is a surprisingly comfortless vision of the afterlife for a poet who identified, like nearly all people of his era, as Christian. Later in the poem the speaker concedes that “It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,” or some kind of heaven; but even this is a far cry from certainty.

Tennyson’s poetry often confronted deep-seated religious doubt. As T. S. Eliot—also a Christian whose poetry flirted with skepticism and outright despair—once wrote of Tennyson’s In Memoriam A.H.H.:

It is not religious for the quality of its faith, but because of the quality of its doubt. Its faith is a poor thing, but its doubt is a very intense experience. In Memoriam is a poem of despair, but of despair of the religious kind. (“Religion and Literature,” 1935)

In Memoriam A.H.H. itself contains the lines:

There lives more faith in honest doubt,
Believe me, than in half the creeds.

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It little profits that an idle king, Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

The opening sentence of the poem makes more syntactical sense (by the rules of contemporary punctuation) if we imagine an implied comma after that, or if we imagine the phrase “an idle king…wife” as set off by dashes:

It little profits that—[as] an idle king, by this still hearth, among these barren crags, matched with an agèd wife—I mete and dole unequal laws…

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Sweet Thames, run softly, for I speak not loud or long. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

This line illustrates how freely Eliot uses his sources throughout The Waste Land. After lifting the previous line from Edmund Spenser, he adds an original line to turn it into a rhymed couplet. Bold!

“Not loud or long” adds to the many intimations of mortality in the poem. The Waste Land’s speaker (or speakers) is just a brief, quiet voice in the ongoing spectacle of nature.

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And along the Strand, The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

Via Wikipedia:

Strand, often called the Strand, is a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster in central London that forms part of the A4 road. It is just over three-quarters of a mile in length from its western origin at Trafalgar Square to its eastern end at Temple Bar, where it continues into Fleet Street, marking Westminster’s boundary with the City of London.

Image via

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And stays. The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

“Stays” were corsets—still worn by many women in the 1920s, though falling out of fashion.

Illustrations from an article on correct corset lacing from the April 1917 issue of Modern Priscilla magazine:

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Camisoles, The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot

Camisoles are a women’s undergarment for the upper body.

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The Shawshank Redemption TV/Movie Genius by Rap Genius Editors

The Shawshank Redemption

Transcribed: Final scene. God-damn right.
Annotated: [x]

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I hope to see my friend and shake his hand. The Shawshank Redemption (Final Monologue) by Frank Darabont (Ft. Morgan Freeman)

His friend, of course, is Andy Dufresne, played by Tim Robbins. As this voiceover plays, we see Red get his wish—although the two of them go for a hug rather than a handshake.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRBl0GPBm4o

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