Where's Heloise, the learned nun,
For whose sake Abeillard, I ween,
Lost manhood and put priesthood on?
The Ballad of Dead Ladies by Dante Gabriel Rossetti (Ft. François Villon)

Alludes to the 12th-century story of Héloïse’s illicit love for, and secret marriage to, her teacher Pierre Abélard—perhaps the most popular teacher and philosopher in Paris—and the brutal vengeance that her family exacts when they castrate him, even though the lovers had married.

Alexander Pope told a version of the story in his poem “Eloisa to Abelard.”

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Until, shocker!
A reluctant kiss by his locker
Hair standing on end, no longer just friends
Boy Meets World (Slam Poem) by Samuel L. Jackson

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dZnBYGX7PSQ “Hair standing on end” could have an emotional resonance here —feelings of surprise, fear, the uncanny—or could refer to the fact that Cory’s hair is doing something weird.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

The year: 1993
We see
Two boys who lack both brains and brawn
Boy Meets World (Slam Poem) by Samuel L. Jackson

Cory and Shawn, Season 1

Cory and Shawn, post-Meeting with World

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Fee-ee-eeeeeenay!
The Feeney call, for he was always just steps away
Boy Meets World (Slam Poem) by Samuel L. Jackson

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

Nor do not saw the air
Too much with your hand, thus,
Hamlet Act 3 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

i.e. Don’t make overdramatic gestures with your hands. Hamlet is referring to something like the acting no-no called “indicating”:

Indicating
Unrealistic acting. At its worst it is often associated with acting of the past in which realism was not ubiquitously prized and stereotyped gestures were used to “indicate” emotions rather than actually showing them.

Robert Frost may have indirectly alluded to this line in his poem “Out, Out—,” whose title is a direct Shakespearean quotation (from Macbeth). Compare:

At the word, the saw,
As if to prove saws knew what supper meant,
Leaped out at the boy’s hand, or seemed to leap—
He must have given the hand. However it was,
Neither refused the meeting. But the hand!
The boy’s first outcry was a rueful laugh
As he swung toward them holding up the hand
Half in appeal, but half as if to keep
The life from spilling.

If Frost has Hamlet’s line in mind, the allusion is ironic: if anything, the boy who was sawing—and who has now mutilated himself with the saw—is underplaying the severity of the moment as he gestures for help.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

4. June 5 Months That Are Crueler Than April by Poetry Genius

A beautiful month—so beautiful that everyone decides it’s Wedding Season. Have fun spending a third of your summer in awkward, restrictive formal wear.

Also a month marked by sobering contemplation of the 1953 June Uprising in East Germany. You’re telling me that’s less tragic than a bunch of lilacs?

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

2. August 5 Months That Are Crueler Than April by Poetry Genius

The February of summer. It has its moments, but also its unbearable moments. And many more to come!

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

5. Crueltober 5 Months That Are Crueler Than April by Poetry Genius

Surprisingly mild, but still worse than April.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

April 10th, 2014

And…we lose Daylight Savings Time!

Add a suggestion

3. September 5 Months That Are Crueler Than April by Poetry Genius

A pleasant month weather-wise. Too bad it’s also Back to School season. This wouldn’t be such a big deal for most grown-ups, except that the current economy has created an entire underemployed generation (and another on the way!) clinging desperately to the fringes of academia, only to find out once they cling long enough that there are even fewer jobs inside the academy than outside.

The changing leaves are nice and all, but feel that sharp little chill in the air? Yeah, so do the youth of America.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +

1. February 5 Months That Are Crueler Than April by Poetry Genius

Logically, the cruelest month must be the cruelest winter month. In our neck of the Northern Hemisphere, that’s February. By the time this frosty bastard hits the calendar, the holidays are a distant memory and the snow-sprinkled wonderland that charmed you for a week or so in late November has crusted over into a frigid polar hellscape. All your friends go so batshit from cabin fever and actual fever that they start snidely addressing winter—“OK, winter, you can leave now”—as if the axis of the planet asked their personal opinion.

Then you check the date to see when the agony will end and realize tomorrow’s Valentine’s Day.

This video is processing – it'll appear automatically when it's done.

Show other contributors +