There's no trust,
No faith, no honesty in men; all perjured,
All forsworn, all naught, all dissemblers.
Romeo and Juliet Act 3 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Perjured and forsworn both refer to lying under oath or breaking a promise. Dissemblers are liars. The Nurse effectively calls men liars 6 or 7 times over.

Compare Hamlet’s warning to Ophelia in Act 3, Scene 1 of Hamlet: “We [men] are arrant knaves all; believe none of us.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vjwc9cxKcEs

trust i.e. trustworthiness
honesty (a) truthfulness, (b) honourable character
perjured not only guilty of perjury but characterizes by it
naught (a) good for nothing, (b) wicked

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There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.
Hamlet Act 1 Scene 5 by William Shakespeare

One of the more famous lines in a play full of famous lines. Hamlet teasingly portrays Horatio (his school friend from Wittenberg University) as a narrow rationalist out of tune with the more exotic possibilities of the universe — such as ghosts walking the night. Implicitly, Hamlet’s own philosophy is more capacious and more willing to admit new, strange phenomena.

Telephone inventor Alexander Graham Bell quoted this line in an early wax recording, now held at the Smithsonian.

Jorge Luis Borges borrowed this phrase for the title of his short story “There Are More Things,” inspired by the horror fiction of H. P. Lovecraft. The story evokes the presence of a supernatural or extraterrestrial creature without actually describing it.

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If I could write the beauty of your eyes, Sonnet 17 by William Shakespeare

If I could capture the beauty of your eyes in poetry. Pretty straightforward.

Time for some intense eyes:

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With all my love I do commend me to you: Hamlet Act 1 Scene 5 by William Shakespeare

i.e., I give you all my thanks and love.

Here and in the following lines we have another example of Hamlet’s courtly speech. Such elegance of language would have been proper to a prince, but Hamlet has a particular reputation for being a silver-tongued charmer, as Ophelia reminds us in Act 3, Scene 1:

Oh, what a noble mind is here o'erthrown!—
The courtier’s, soldier’s, scholar’s, eye, tongue, sword,…
And I, of ladies most deject and wretched,
That sucked the honey of his music vows…

(emphasis added)

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With my love's picture then my eye doth feast, Sonnet 47 by William Shakespeare

i.e., My eye feasts on the picture of my love.

“Feast” picks up on “famish’d” in line 3; the extended metaphor continues with “banquet” in the next line, which in turn prompts “guest” in line 7. Shakespeare’s speaker is hungry for loving, but has to make do with a picture as appetizer. Nowadays he’d be drooling over the lover’s online profile pics.

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In Minsk. Alena's Boy by Anna J. Rogers 3

Minsk is the capital and largest city of Belarus, with a population of 2,002,600 in 2013.

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On 25 March 2014, Belarus´ Freedom Day, Belarusian Dream Theater (Press Release) by Brendan McCall

Currently an unofficial holiday in Belarus, which the government does not support and which is celebrated by Belarusians who do not support the government.

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Junot Díaz on why he "simply [went] buckwild" like Melville in an Oscar Wao footnote. Shakespearean Swag: Our Favorite Literary Annotations on Rap Genius by Poetry Genius Editors

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The Gwendolyn Brooks elegy that fulfills the goal of all elegies. Shakespearean Swag: Our Favorite Literary Annotations on Rap Genius by Poetry Genius Editors

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O, O, O, O yeah Shakespearean Swag: Our Favorite Literary Annotations on Rap Genius by Poetry Genius Editors

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