I don't understand this concept.

Iambic: An unaccented syllable followed by an accented one like r(e)-p(e)at
Anapestic: Two unaccented syllables before on accented like i(n)-t(e)r-r(u)pt
Trochaic: An accented syllable followed by an unaccented like ol(d)-e®
Dactylic: An accented syllable followed by two unaccented like(o)-p(e)n-l(y)
Spondaic: Two accented syllables like hea®t Bre(a)k

WTF? how can I write this in my poetry? or how can this be done in rap?

August 15th, 2011
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546

What’s the big deal? I don’t get your problem.

August 15th, 2011

I want to be a better poet.

“If you want to write poetry, knowing about meter will make you a better poet. First, it helps you understand what poets have done in the past, so that you can learn from them. It allows you to use traditional forms such as sonnets”

August 15th, 2011
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546

I see. Well I still don’t know your question about the unaccented and accented syllables in words and the rhythm that can be created. What’s the question, really?

August 15th, 2011

The question was “How do you know what is anapestic or trochaic? or etc.”

August 15th, 2011
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546

Dude you just listed the definitions. Isn’t that enough to distinguish. Take ‘Patrick’. P(a)t(ri)ck is Trochaic.

August 15th, 2011

I still don’t understand it though. Knowing is different from understanding.

August 15th, 2011

Get a poetry teacher. Take a poetry class.

August 15th, 2011
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546

Wolfman, no. That’s all I’ll say.

Patrick, dude you sure take your time huh? Think about it this way: When you say the words, do you deliberately accent them? Would that particular syllable sound different in a DIFFERENT accent? If your answer is yes to both, chances are it’s accented.

Take ‘chair’. It has one syllable, but two vowels. That means you have to mash and mix the two sounds together. Therefore, it is accented — i.e, not ‘natural’. Almost all syllables with two vowels work this way.

Now take ‘lucid’. It has two syllables: lu-cid. ‘Lu’ is said as (loo) and ‘cid’ is said as (sid). The ‘lu’ is dragged out. It is not the sound of a ‘u’ so it’s accented, whereas ‘cid’ is perfectly normal so it’s unaccented. Therefore, ‘lucid’ is Trochaic.

Now take ‘ionic’. Can you tell me what it is? Just listen to yourself as you say it and say it slowly. That’ll work until you get practice.

August 16th, 2011

I’d say it was dactylic…because the stress sounds like it’s on the “I” then unstressed on “on” and “ic”.

August 16th, 2011

I found a website that may help understand it better but there is another thing I don’t understand.

http://www.creative-writing-now.com/poetry-meter.html

Trimeter, Tetrameter, pentameter or hexameter.

August 16th, 2011
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546

Wow man… At least try to master the stuff you know before you move on! And believe me, if you write enough and try a lot, not to mention you’re creative with it, you’ll know most of the stuff in the books and when you read one you’ll be like, “These terms are stupid. I know this already.” Meaning, the technical terms DO NOT MATTER. They are just there so you don’t have to explain what you’re talking about every time. You can come up with your own, if you like. I’m not a fan of them myself. So just read up the definition, see examples etc., then forget the term. It only serves as a confusion.

August 16th, 2011

I’m at least beginning to learn the difference between words that have stress in them and those that do not, but yeah I see what you’re saying.

August 16th, 2011
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546

As for the ‘feet’, it is the rhythm. Period. It is literally the rhythm of the poem. Usually you can make it as long as you like. I even use it when I write rap lyrics. I can even invent a whole other foot: it DOESN’T MATTER, again. I could be A-a-a-A, if you like. Or even D-D-D-D-D-d. I think I’ll call that one the ‘boner’ LOL. For basics, though, you should stick to the ones they mentioned. They are very easy to get, read, and very natural in writing. Then you can count them, have caesurae, change rhythm, combine them, or whatever you like. Just remember to practice before you learn further and try to do the exact opposite of the so-called ‘tutorials’ say.

August 16th, 2011
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546

And about meters, that’s the ‘foot-count’ of the particular line. Which tends to have a scheme in most poems. Even more so in ballads.

August 16th, 2011