("REE-WIND!!" --]) Blow Your Mind by Redman

Vocal sample of KRS-ONE from Boogie Down Production’s song “Duck Down” from their 1992 album Sex and Violence.

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Krush Groovin Blow Your Mind by Redman

A reference to the 1985 movie Krush Groove. The film is based on the early days of Def Jam Recordings and up-and-coming record producer Russell Simmons. Redman was signed to Def Jam at the time.

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With Ricky D Old School by 2Pac

MC Ricky D was the name rapper Slick Rick originally went by on previously mentioned rapper Doug E. Fresh’s single “The Show” (and the B-Side, “La-Di-Da-Di”).

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I'm living in Waco Texas American Psycho by D12

Waco, Texas is an actual city in eastern Texas halfway between Dallas and Austin. Bizarre claims to live here due to the fact that he himself is a “wacko” i.e. crazy/psycho.

This is could possibly be a reference to the Waco massacre, in which the Branch Davidian religious group and the United States federal and Texas state law enforcement and military engaged in a stand-off that left 86 dead. To this day, it’s seen as a controversial event, in which the government grossly overstepped their boundaries.

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[Verse Two: Dr. Dre] Your Wife by Nate Dogg (Ft. Dr. Dre)

It is acknowledged that most of Dr. Dre’s raps are written for him by others, though he retains complete control over his lyrics and the themes of his songs. As Aftermath producer Mahogany told Scratch: “It’s like a class room in the booth. He’ll have three writers in there. They’ll bring in something, he’ll recite it, then he’ll say. ‘Change this line, change this word,’ like he’s grading papers”. As seen in the credits for tracks Dre has appeared on, there are often multiple people who contribute to his songs. However, this is one of the few Dr. Dre verses that he has written himself, along with his verse on the hit Tupac song “California Love”.

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("Okay! O-o-o-okay-k-kay! Kay-k-kay, kay-kay!") Dear Lord by Obie Trice

A remixed audio sample of Al Pacino, sampled from the famous 1983 gangster movie Scarface.

The sample is taken from one of the most well known and notorious lines from the movie

Okay, I’m reloaded!

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Visions of prisons for all the pussies that I blasted If I Die 2Nite by 2Pac

There are two possible meanings to this line

  • In November 1993, Tupac and others were charged with sexually assaulting a woman in a hotel room. According to the complaint, Shakur sodomized the woman and then encouraged his friends to sexually abuse her. Shakur denied the charges. According to Shakur, he had prior relations days earlier with the woman, she performed oral sex on him on a club dance floor, and the two later had consensual sex in his hotel room. The complainant claimed sexual assault after her second visit to Shakur’s hotel room. She alleged that Shakur and his entourage raped her. Tupac is fearful that every woman he’s ever fucked (or pussy he’s ever “blasted”) will also accuse him with sexual assault/rape, causing him to go to prison (Which did end up happening after he was found guilty).

  • “Pussies” is referring to cowardly people who he’s killed/blasted with a gun, which would cause him to be sentenced to jail for murder.

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It'll make Christopher Reeves start walking Pistol Pistol by D12

Christopher D'Olier Reeve (Often misspelled, mispronounced, and mistaken as Reeves) was an American actor, film director, producer, screenwriter, author and activist, most famous for his motion picture portrayal of fictional superhero Superman. On May 27, 1995 Reeve became a quadriplegic after being thrown from a horse in an equestrian competition in Virginia. He required a wheelchair and breathing apparatus for the rest of his life.

Bizarre’s 9mm pistol is so intimidating that it’d provoke Reeve (who was still alive at the time of this song’s release) to come out of his paralysis and walk (probably run) away.

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Keep my hand on my gun cause they got me on the run Extradition by Ice Cube

Cube always has to be aware and on the lookout for the people searching for him, therefore always keeps his hand on his gun in order to always be ready to shoot.

The line is a reference to the classic 1982 Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five song “The Message” which has an identical line in the fourth verse.

The line was also famously used by Snoop Doggy Dogg in the 1996 2Pac song “2 Of Amerikaz Most Wanted” in Snoop’s first verse.

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Pac was busy yelling Hit Em Up
When she was turning five
We was worried bout the coastal war
Picking choosing sides
Bad Boy made noise
Brenda's Baby by Sha Stimuli

Brenda’s fictional baby would have turned 5 in 1996, 5 years after the release of “Brenda’s Got a Baby”. It was at this time when Tupac released his infamous diss track “Hit ‘Em Up”. While rapper Tim Dog was the first to diss the opposite coast with his notorious song “Fuck Compton” in 1991, “Hit ‘Em Up” is what sparked and somewhat started the East Coast West Coast hip hop rivalry. Following its release, the East Coast rappers insulted in the song responded through tracks of their own. The controversy surrounding the song is due in part to Shakur’s murder only a few months after its release. The song was released after the release of The Notorious B.I.G.’s “Who Shot Ya?”, which Shakur interpreted as a diss song mocking his robbery/shooting. Tupac appeared on numerous tracks aiming threatening and/or antagonistic slants at Biggie, Bad Boy as a label, and anyone affiliated with them from late 1995 to 1996. During this time the media became heavily involved and dubbed the rivalry a coastal rap war, reporting on it continually. This caused fans from both scenes to take sides.

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