Parliament - Mothership Connection Mothership Connection Album Art by Parliament (Ft. Gribbitt!)

The cover art for Mothership Connection finds ParliamentFunkadelic frontman George Clinton flying in a space ship, accompanying the album’s theme: the arrival of Clinton’s alter ego, Starchild, from space, to bring the people Funk. This “P-Funk mythology”, as it’s called, is further portrayed in other Parliament albums, like Gloryhallastoopid and Funkentelechy Vs. the Placebo Syndrome.

The following quote is from an interview with George Clinton:

We had put black people in situations nobody ever thought they would be in, like the White House. I figured another place you wouldn’t think black people would be was in outer space. I was a big fan of Star Trek, so we did a thing with a pimp sitting in a spaceship shaped like a Cadillac, and we did all these James Brown-type grooves, but with street talk and ghetto slang. Make my funk the P-Funk. It was all kinda like drug talk. We were the first ones to call the music dope.

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G.O.O.D Music Album Art Breakdowns by Art Genius

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Drake Album Art Breakdowns by Art Genius

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Agree's photo

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April 2nd, 2014
Agree's photo

1,093

April 2nd, 2014

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Miles Davis Album Art Breakdowns by Art Genius

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Miles Davis - Live-Evil Live-Evil Album Art by Miles Davis (Ft. Mati Klarwein)

The Live-Evil LP naturally has two-sided album art. One side depicting life, and the other evil. In the book So What: the Life of Miles Davis artist Mati Klarwein spoke shortly about the cover art:

I was doing the picture of the pregnant woman for the cover and the day I finished, Miles called me up and said, ‘I want a picture of life on one side and evil on the other.’ And all he mentioned was a toad. Then next to me was a copy of Time Magazine which had J. Edgar Hoover on the cover, and he just looked like a toad. I told Miles I found the toad.

The “toad” found on the back depicts evil. Even though the drawing involves a few lighter colors than the “life” side, it is still obviously the “evil” side. Examples that show this are the appearance of the “toad” and the darker background. The opposite side prominently shows a woman getting life blown into her stomach, depicting life.

Some people consider these works to give away Miles' look on race. This is because the “life” side only shows colored people, while the “evil” side features a white woman with blonde hair.

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[Intro: *guy talking*]
Good evening. Police, do not try to adjust your radios. There is nothing wrong. We have takin control over this city as to bring you this special bulletin and we will return this motherfucker to ya as soon as the National Guards move in
Say Hi To The Bad Guy by Ice Cube

This intro heavily interpolates the classic “P. Funk (Wants to Get Funked Up)”, in which the Parliament crew create their own radio station on record.

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They still call it the White House
But that's a temporary condition, too
Chocolate City by Parliament

George Clinton already foresaw the coming of a black president in the future. The introduction of a black president — instead of the constant white president — would also call for a renaming and recoloring of the presidential White House.

On Clinton’s 1993 album Hey, Man, Smell My Finger he also had a single called “Paint the White House Black”, featuring an all-star rap cast consisting of N.W.A, Public Enemy, and more.

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Uh, what's happening CC? Chocolate City by Parliament

CC stand for chocolate city, which is a place with majority black inhabitants. In this case CC specifically refers to the capitol of the United States: Washington, D.C.

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Kwamé Mistadobalina by Del tha Funkee Homosapien

Kwamé/Kwam (not to be confused with the producer) is an ex-Hieroglyphics member who also was Del’s manager in the early 90’s.

Kwamé has received writing, producing and composing credits for the Del song “Made in America”, along with Domino and Del himself. He has also provided backing vocals on Souls Of Mischief’s “Battling Practice” together with most members of the early Hiero crew

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CM-PX Mistadobalina by Del tha Funkee Homosapien

CM-PX is the old name of colleague, long-time friend, and fellow Hieroglyphics member Casual.

Casual (left) and Del (right) in a shot from the 2012 music video to “Respect Game or Expect Flames

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