I respect, look up to, and look to Walt Disney and Steve Jobs who dedicated their time, soul and energy to delivering the best product that they knew they could. Places And Spaces I've Been Excerpt by Pharrell Williams (Ft. Kanye West)

It’s interesting to look back in hindsight and see Kanye talking about Walt Disney and Steve Jobs so candidly.

Throughout 2013 West copped a lot of flack for comparing himself to the two creatives. Outbursts included onstage rants and interviews with media personalities

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It’s almost a disease to be a perfectionist. Nothing is ever quite good enough. What is it like to look at things and say to yourself, “I know that they don’t get it but maybe one day they will.” Places And Spaces I've Been Excerpt by Pharrell Williams (Ft. Kanye West)

Think of people with obsessive compulsive disorder — everything has to be just right. A perfectionist deals with the same struggle.

Other famous producers such as Dr. Dre are self confessed perfectionists.

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Like why did I give them that level of promotion? Places And Spaces I've Been Excerpt by Pharrell Williams (Ft. Kanye West)

Good question Kanye…You would have thought naming it Ciroc and getting Diddy to throw you a million dollars would have been a better idea!

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My numbers don't lie when the feds taking score
Cellphone in my name, that's it, nothing more
OG Bobby Johnson (Remix) by Que (Ft. ASAP Ferg, Pusha T & Snoop Dogg) 1

Jay Z once said

Men lie, women lie — numbers don’t

Push might not sell as many records as commercial artists but when it comes to the drug game he’s as real as it gets.

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Old school, I could just kill a man
Kids running up to my old school
Get a hundred dollars from the dealer man
OG Bobby Johnson (Remix) by Que (Ft. ASAP Ferg, Pusha T & Snoop Dogg) 1

Back in the day Push could have just knocked someone off.

So if the bitch live, he’ll walk around with my stencil And if the bitch die, outline him in chalk pencil

When he goes back home to V.A he has kids running up to him asking for money — he’s an O.G, they know he’s a King Pin

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March 13th, 2014

I think this is also referencing the old Cypress Hill song “How I could just kill a man”

“Here is something you can’t understand, I could just kill a man!”

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(OG Bobby Johnson) like I'm straight out of Compton
See my boys in the hood, we a menace, it's a problem
OG Bobby Johnson (Remix) by Que (Ft. ASAP Ferg, Pusha T & Snoop Dogg) 1

Three film references!

  • Bobby Johnson is a major character in Part 1 of the 1982 film South Central set in Los Angeles.

  • The 1991 film Boyz N The Hood, staring Ice Cube

  • 1993’s Menace II Society

Push plays on the fact its set in L.A with a nod to N.W.A’s famous album/song “Straight Outta Compton”. Compton and South Central are right next to each other!

Straight outta Compton, crazy motherfucker named Ice Cube
From the gang called Niggas Wit Attitudes

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baka
February 28th, 2014

he says “we a menace, its a problem”, this is also a reference to Compton rappers, Compton Menace and Problem.

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Nigga had a brick in a rental
Since I ain't dead or in jail from it
Put my life in this instrumental
OG Bobby Johnson (Remix) by Que (Ft. ASAP Ferg, Pusha T & Snoop Dogg) 1

Reference to a brick of cocaine. Since Push isn’t in a box from his exploits he writes the realest bars to express his lifestyle to the people.

I sold more dope than I sold records
You niggas sold records, never sold dope
So I ain’t hearing none of that street shit
Cause in my mind, you mothafuckas sold soap

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[Produced by J.U.S.T.I.C.E. League] Thug Cry by Rick Ross (Ft. Lil Wayne) 1

During an interview with XXL Magazine Justice League explained how the track came about:

Ross has sort of chosen to keep fucking with us because the chemistry is obviously there. Whether it be during the beginning stages of his projects or the ending stage of his project, we always kind of get in with him or get in contact with him about final touch ups or whatever. I think we all know that there’s a chemistry there.

Ross tends to gravitate towards the music that we make that most people don’t know what to do with. They might be scared of it or they just don’t know what to do with it. He has a history of just picking off the beaten path basically. He’ll pick the tracks that nobody else picks and everyone is mad at us because we didn’t send them that beat or whatever. Most of the time, they just didn’t take that beat.

The hook was sung by Betty Idol. You gotta remember that the beat was made in 2013. So it was the twenty year anniversary of “93 ‘til Infinity.” So we did that. It was paying homage. That decade year long classic. We got Betty Idol to write and perform the hook on it. It was undeniable. We just went ahead and sent it off to Ross. You know Ross likes to push the boundaries, like we said earlier. Once you hear the hook? Ah, shit. That shit’s crazy.

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[Produced by Scott Storch] Supreme by Rick Ross (Ft. Keith Sweat)

During an interview with XXL Magazine Scott explained how the track came about:

Essentially, when I am making the beginnings or nucleus of the tracks, I’m doing most of that stuff on my own in my room. I have certain people that I hear the tracks for. Whether I am making it for them in the beginning or somewhere halfway through, this could go to this person or this would be hot for this person. I think a lot of beatmakers and producers, after making something and realizing, “Oh, this would sound awesome for this person.” Something that we all do. Just trying in your brain [to] visualize them on the track and their patterns and their tones. Who’s going to sound good on what.

I remember when we did this record, we ran it right to him and he immediately felt it. He was like, “That’s mine right there.” He got on the mic immediately and that was when the real joy comes in. You actually get a chance to hear them. And it was sort of tease. We brought it to his house and he jumped on the mic and we listened to him record on it. I mean, he’s real fast. He writes in like, seconds. I watched him in the studio one day writing for other people. He had like three or four different artists for Cash Money that he was writing hooks and did a verse for. Man, it was awesome. He’s a beast with that.

What I am getting from it is he made a record that I think will reach not just the dudes. Out of the whole body of music on that album, it’s definitely something where he’s talking about all the fly shit. I think it’s something that the girls will connect to, too. There’s that one and the one he did with The Weeknd, “In Vein,” as far as universal, everybody likes it, type of record. A lot of the stuff on the album is really dark. Amazing, but it’s one of the brighter records on the album.

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[Produced by Reefa] What A Shame by Rick Ross (Ft. French Montana)

During an interview with XXL Magazine Reefa explained how the track came about:

I’m just in the era from the 90s, the early 2000s, the whole New York era, the feel good music. Me and Ross had a relationship before. And we still have a relationship. I was in the studio with French. I played French the joint, he laid a hook to it, and he ended up sending it to Ross. Ross was like, we going to keep it for the album. Before that I did the “Ice Cold” beat on God Forgives, I Don’t. It’s almost like the same kind of drum patterns or same kind of sound I’m trying to really push out with my whole ATM Company.

I just caught a vibe, I played the melody, and I have a producer on my team his name is stats, he laid all the color around it and we just went from there. I had the drums going for a while but I just wanted it to knock the right way. People ain’t really hitting their head. It ain’t that mood no more.; that whole 90s kind of mood. So I kind of wanted to bring a little bit of that back with a current sound. When I’m messing with Ross or whoever, I try to give them something that everybody else wouldn’t do. I tip my hat off to Ross and French, they know what they’re doing. It wasn’t pressure or whatever, it was a real collaboration. A real song put together from start to finish

Me and Ross, we’re in a great space. I knew it was crazy from just the beat. When I heard the hook, the hook took it to a crazy other level. I knew it was one of those types of joints when I first did it, that it was gong to be crazy and something that special.

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