Comondy Taming of the Shrew Introduction Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Comedy, rather.

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Semiramis Taming of the Shrew Introduction Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Semiramis was an Assyrian queen who, after the death of her husband, went on to revive Babylon and conquer Asia Minor and Northern Africa.

She is also credited with inventing the chastity belt. Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus credits her as the first person to castrate a male youth into eunuch-hood: “Semiramis, that ancient queen who was the first person to castrate male youths of tender age”

Source: Wikipedia

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Burtonheath, Taming of the Shrew Introduction Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Means Burton-on-the-heath, “a small village on the borders of Warwickshire and Oxfordshire.

How Shakespeare might have seen Burtonheath

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Nay, by Saint Jamy,
I hold you a penny,
A horse and a man
Is more than one,
And yet not many.
Taming of the Shrew Act 3 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

Saint Jamy probably refers to a figure revered in the Middle Ages, St James of Compostella, here ironically contrasted with the irreverent Petruchio.

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Turn him to any cause of policy,
The Gordian knot of it he will unloose,
Familiar as his garter:
Henry V Act 1 Scene 1 by William Shakespeare

The Gordian Knot is often used as a metaphor for an intractable problem (disentangling an “impossible” knot) solved easily by cheating or “thinking outside the box” (“cutting the Gordian knot”).

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Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world
Like a Colossus
Julius Caesar Act 1 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

A Colossus is a GIANT statue. This simile characterizes Caesar as behaving like a Colossus so large that he walks alongside the earth.

The Colossus of Rhodes

The Colossus of Nero

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Pompey's Julius Caesar Act 1 Scene 3 by William Shakespeare

A great Roman military/political leader and a member of The First Triumvirate. Not to be confused with the city of tragic fame, Pompeii.

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Enter CINNA Julius Caesar Act 1 Scene 3 by William Shakespeare

If you were ever wondering where Suzanne Collins got the name for her Hunger Games character (played by Lenny Kravitz in the film adaptation), look no further!

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Drachmas. Julius Caesar Act 3 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

An ancient Greek unit of currency found in many Greek city states from Classical times on. One common estimate for its value would be the average daily pay for a skilled worker. So seventy-five drachmas would be about two and a half months pay.

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You all did see that on the Lupercal Julius Caesar Act 3 Scene 2 by William Shakespeare

The Lupercal (from lupa, Latin for she-wolf) is a cave at the foot of the Palatine Hill in Rome, between the Temple of Apollo Palatinus and the Basilica of Santa Anastasia. In the legend of Rome’s foundation, Romulus and Remus were found there by the lactating female wolf who suckled them until they were found by Faustulus."

Source: Wikipedia

At this same spot, so important to the founding of Rome, everyone witnessed Antony try to crown Caesar king.

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