Look
I can't say I got it all figured out
All I know is it's something I can't live without
Image Consultant by Voss 45

Voss closes the song by admitting that he’s still young and doesn’t have all of what he discussed, or life in general, figured out yet, but he is sure that he cannot live without the art he makes and loves dearly.

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Reality's a fallacy that fools fearin', Image Consultant by Voss 45

The images the media often projects as “reality” (even outside of music) is oftentimes a lie that only fools would be afraid of, whether it be the drug-selling, gang-banging image of a rapper, or Weapons of Mass Destruction.

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What side are you on? Who YOU cheerin'? Image Consultant by Voss 45

The listener is asked which side of the debate discussed in the song they are on: those who merely use hip-hop to massage their ego and get paid, or those who use it to send a more resonant message through their lyrics?

In reality though, it’s not about “sides”, and fans of the genre should not “cheer” exclusively for either; rather they would be better off to appreciate both sides, rather than treating the genre like some sort of sports game.

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Spike the champagne with some truth serum Image Consultant by Voss 45

The question of “should educating and entertaining keep separate?” is recalled in this line, as Voss orders the listener to spike mainstream, more influential rappers' champagne that they commonly brag about drinking with truth serum, so that honesty can once again become prevalent in hip-hop.

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Go below the surface, put your head to the linoleum
Then you can hear what the youth hearin'
Image Consultant by Voss 45

The listener is urged to look below the proverbial “surface” of what they hear from present day hip-hop and told to “put [their] head to the linoleum”, meaning to listen below the metaphorical “floor” (linoleum) to hear what’s going on in the “underground” of the genre.
Once they do this, they will be able to hear what the intelligent youth is really listening to, and thus become more in touch with what our future could potentially become (hopefully).

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Insecurity forever been controllin' 'em Image Consultant by Voss 45

A continuation of the previous line, meaning that a lot of these “macho” types in hip-hop on power trips are motivated to act in such a way by nothing but their own insecurities.

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Only complex when it's prefaced with "Napoleon" Image Consultant by Voss 45

The only way one could call such characters “complex” would be if they were commenting on their Napoleon complex (that’s wordplay, kids), which technically means that they are essentially assholes because of insecurities stemming from being short in height. However, here it refers to anyone who acts like a jerk, regardless of height, because they feel they are inadequate inside.

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They skeleton is gelatin, petroleum Image Consultant by Voss 45

These “tough guy” types overpopulating hip-hop are oftentimes soft at heart, as their backbone (and entire skeleton for that matter) are compared to petroleum jelly.

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K.O...punch drunk off power
They know hay-makers make the punk come out ya
Image Consultant by Voss 45

Continuing with the boxing metaphors, frustrated rappers returning to drug dealing is ultimately an admission of failure in their craft (compared to a knockout in a boxing match). While they may be the kings of their neighborhood (“punch drunk off power”), they are ultimately quitters, and deep down, realize that when some real shit goes down, they will run away from it all over again (“hay-makers make the punk come out ya”).

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Seen cats quit rap to pitch crack
Back to their corners, round's over
Image Consultant by Voss 45

Many aspiring emcees become frustrated with their craft for one reason or another and wind up returning to selling drugs to get by with much easier, faster money. The act of going back to their street corners to sell said narcotics is compared to boxers going back to their corners of the ring at the end of a round.

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