Put him in double-darbies Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Shackle his wrists and ankles.

The double-darbies

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Orlop Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

The lowest deck of a ship.

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Nor all the coopers in creation couldn't show hoops enough to make oughts enough Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Coopers make barrels. Traditionally, the used iron hoops to structure a barrel. An aught, misspelled ought here, is a O (remember the aughts? you ought to [sorry])…so Stubbs is saying that Fedallah is really old. He needs to put large numbers in very physical terms for Flask.

Hoops for making barrels

Hoop earrings

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"How old do you suppose Fedallah is, Stubb?" Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Flask doesn’t quite get the whole devil thing.

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"Three Spaniards? Adventures of those three bloody-minded soladoes? Did ye read it there, Flask? I guess ye did?"

"No: never saw such a book; heard of it, though.
Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

The Three Spaniards is a trashy novel by George Walker that was published in 1800. Stubbs is messing with Flask, implying that he has low-brow taste in literature. Flask hasn’t read the book, but he’s “heard of it.”

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Now that I think of it, he's always wanting oakum to stuff into the toes of his boots Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Oakum is fiber (usually hemp) covered in tar. It was used to caulk (seal) the joints between pieces of timber on a ship. Stubbs is suggesting that Fedallah needs oakum to fill the toes of his boots, which are empty because, being the devil, he has hooves instead of human feet.

Oakum

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"I wonder what the old man wants with this lump of foul lard," said Stubb, not without some disgust at the thought of having to do with so ignoble a leviathan.

"Wants with it?" said Flask, coiling some spare line in the boat's bow, "did you never hear that the ship which but once has a Sperm Whale's head hoisted on her starboard side, and at the same time a Right Whale's on the larboard; did you never hear, Stubb, that that ship can never afterwards capsize?"

"Why not?

"I don't know, but I heard that gamboge ghost of a Fedallah saying so, and he seems to know all about ships' charms. But I sometimes think he'll charm the ship to no good at last. I don't half like that chap, Stubb. Did you ever notice how that tusk of his is a sort of carved into a snake's head, Stubb?"
Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Fedallah is Ahab’s Rabbi, and his influence is growing.

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Fagged Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

Tired

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Rods Moby-Dick (Chap. 73: Stubb and Flask Kill a Right Whale; and Then Have a Talk Over Him) by Herman Melville

A rod is 16.5 feet.

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Calomel and jalap Moby-Dick (Chap. 72: The Monkey-Rope) by Herman Melville

Calomel, or Mercury(1) Chloride, and Jalap a mexican root, are both purgatives, meaning they help you poop.

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