Rap Technique: "Internal Rhymes"??? (Big Pun)

There’s a technique I notice in certain rappers, but especially Big Pun, and don’t know what it’s called.

Example:

“I’m the epitome of catchin' wreck,
Catch you when you cash your check,
smash you when you pass,
and jack you for your f*ckin' lex”

There’s 4 lines to that rhyme. Lines 1,2,4 rhyme with “catching wreck” “cash your check” “jack you for your f*ckin lex”… but line 3 builds tension by rhyming “smash you when you pass”… the 2 halfs of line 3 rhyme with itself, but not with lines 1,2,4, and it gives line 4 more impact when it resolves the tension from lines 1,2. Like when you’re hearing “smash you when you pass”, there’s tension, and you’re expecting the last line to finish the rhyme that started with the first 2.

Same here:

“I’m still the Fat One that you love to hate,
catch you at your mother’s wake,
Smack you then I wack you,
with my snub trey-eight”

“love to hate”, “mothers wake”, “snub trey-eight” in part 1,2,4, but rhymes “Smack you then I wack you” in line 3 to build tension and gives “snub trey-eight” more impact. While you’re hearing “Smack you then I wack you”, it suspends the unresolved tension created by “hate” and “wake” in the first 2 lines, and when it resolves with “snub trey-eight” it “releases” the tension and completes the rhyme.


Is there some name for this rhyming technique? I could give countless examples, just listen to any Big Pun song.

It seems like Big Pun’s trademark, he uses it constantly. Nas, Mobb Deep, Big L, AZ, Eminem, Fat Joe, and many more use this technique, there’s got to be a name for it!

August 4th, 2012

Since this is with four lines, can you make sure if you write down the whole verse like this, that it still has 16 bars, and not more? Because it could just be

I’m the epitome of catchin' wreck, catch you when you cash your check
smash you when you pass, and jack you for your fuckin' lex

I’m still the Fat One that you love to hate, catch you at your mother’s wake
Smack you then I wack you with my snub trey-eight

This is very common when it comes to punchlines

August 4th, 2012
TheLegion's photo

3,666

That’s internal rhyme schemes

I ain’t no joke, I use to let the mic smoke
Now I slam it when I’m done and make sure it’s broke

Put my tape on pause and add some more to yours
Then you figure you’re ready for the neighborhood chores

And it has been started by The God MC,RAKIM.

August 5th, 2012

testing to try to post [b]bold[/b]

August 5th, 2012

testing to try to post

August 5th, 2012

testing to try to post bold

August 5th, 2012

Wasn’t your 2nd example Fat Joe’s verse?

August 5th, 2012
TheLegion's photo

3,666

@endorush
bold ,without the space
bold

August 5th, 2012

how??

August 5th, 2012

@ Nike, Yeah it’s either Joe or Pun in all my examples


I’ll try to explain better…

(I changed the 3rd line to make it so all 4 lines have the last 3 syllables rhyme):

“I’m still the Fat One that you love to hate,
Catch you at your mother’s wake,
shoot her in the f*ckin' face,
with my snub trey-eight”

all 4 lines end with the same 3 rhyming syllables (in bold)…

BUT

in this example, it’s the exact same thing, except the 3rd line is replaced with 2 half lines:

“I’m still the Fat One that you love to hate,
catch you at your mother’s wake,
Smack you then I whack you,
with my snub trey-eight”

“smack you” and “whack you” are a “sub-rhyme/internal-rhyme”… both halfs of line 3 rhymes with themselves, but not lines 1,2,4…

I think “AlCapone” probably has the right answer with “Internal Rhymes”


Let me try to show it like this:

Instead of:

A
A
A
A

it’s:

A
A
B, B
A


I was just wondering what it’s called when you rhyme new syllables inside of an unrelated rhyme structure

instead of

A
A
A
A

replace one of those A’s with 2 B’s:

A
b,b
A
A

or

A
A
b,b
A

August 5th, 2012
TheLegion's photo

3,666

I think it’s stii considered internal rhyme schemes.
You don’t have to rhyme 4 lines for it to be internal rhymes.
Having a line rhyming with an another which use internal rhyming schemes is just a mix of ending rhyming and internal rhyming schemes.
It can be quite confusing.

I ain’t no joke, I use to let the mic smoke
Now I slam it when I’m done and make sure it’s broke

August 5th, 2012

You’re probably right with “internal rhyme schemes”, but I just want to clarify because we’re almost on the same page, but there’s a slight difference with what i’m talking about.

your example is an A-A-B-A, where lines 1,2,4 rhyme, but line 3 (“Now I slam it when I’m done”) doesn’t… It’s deliberate, and it’s effective because it creates suspense/contrast while the listener waits an extra line for you to resolve the “joke, smoke” rhyme, and makes it more effective when it (“broke”) hits.

so we’re both already familiar with that…


but what i’m talking about, is if you take the “B” from the “A-A-B-A”, and replace it with 2 “half-lines” that rhyme with each other… so you have ending syllables on lines 1,2,4 rhyming with each other, but also the end syllables of each half of line 3 rhyming with each other:

A-A- (b/b) -A

example, instead of your rhyme:

I ain’t no joke
I use to let the mic smoke
Now I slam it when I’m done
and make sure it’s broke

if I replaced line 3 with:

I ain’t no joke
I use to let the mic smoke
Now I slam it like kevin durant
an make sure the fukkin mic’s broke


still using line 3 to contrast lines 1,2,4 since it doesn’t rhyme with them, but splitting line 3 in half and making it rhyme with itself.


I’m fascinated by this concept, and hear a lot of this when I listen to local underground rappers (I’m in Boston)… I just didn’t know if there was a name for this technique, or if there was anywhere to read up on in.

I listened to a lot of BIG PUN recently, and noticed that nearly all his rhymes use this technique, and it’s awesome!

I was hoping there was some place to read up on this technique.


Thanks to everyone who has responded I appreciate it!

August 5th, 2012

Yeah, Kool G Rap has the same technique. Kool G Rap said in an interview that Big Pun sorta took that G-Rap style and took it to another level. G-Rap also said Pun kneeled out of respect the first time he went him. Megalon of Monsta Island Czars rymes sorta like that.

I agree with the term internal rhyming. Some may call it compound rhyming. But Pun’s scheme is to make as many words rhyme as possible. And use words with similiar structure.

“Dead in the middle of little italy/little did we know we riddled some middle man/ who didn’t do diddily”

August 5th, 2012
August 5th, 2012

“Dead in the middle of little italy/little did we know we riddled some middle man/ who didn’t do diddily”


Classic!!!

August 6th, 2012