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A line of validation for the speaker. They have resolved the internal debate witnessed in the late-song shifts in tone and have a new beginning of sorts, looking for Sydney.

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A broader acceptance for the aforementioned jailbirds — those who might not be able to reply in a similar way (singing back) can do it in their own. Singing to deaf ears and eliciting a response is also a metaphor for crossing religious lines. The speaker of this song doesn’t think their message is lost on those who do believe in a Biblical heaven.

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The second shift in the song. Dismisses the previous four bars as paranoia, overthinking and anxiousness.

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Sydney might be unhappy. When the speaker’s life is okay — not great, but okay — he forgets to look for her.

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When it becomes costly (literally and figuratively), relationships tend to be appraised more for their lowest moments.

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A phone plan is like Sydney, Australia — the other person is in this world, but they remain unseen. At this point, the speaker is dissatisfied with that arrangement. If we’re aware heaven may exist on this earth but can’t always see it, is it any good?

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koolo's photo

132

February 5th, 2012

Interesting fact: This line doesn’t rhyme at all. It’s more artsy that way.

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Shift in the song — ‘it’ is inflicting unhappiness (specifically anxiety).

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Another double meaning:

*People ride into the sunset when they have accomplished all they set out to and feel fulfilled. Maybe these people (the jailbirds, the waitresses etc) will never feel happy in this life if they’re always waiting.

*Playing off the title of the EP (Los Angeles) and the waitress bar (aspiring entertainers), ‘sunset’ can also refer to Sunset Blvd, where many aspire to be. If they can’t reach their unseen aspirations (entertaining or a Biblical heaven) they may never find ANY happiness.

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Directed back at Sydney: those who wouldn’t believe the speaker is falling in love with them would most likely not find heaven in the same things.

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Waitresses represent the quintessential average, everyman character. This is also an attempt at a cultural double meaning — in film, television and literature, waitresses are most often depicted as one of two personality types: flighty, airy, girls with aspirations that are either nonexistent or seemingly fantasy; or jaded older women with excessive self awareness. Sometimes, both cast types would disbelieve someone falling in love with them.

Also, waitresses are very clearly of this world and of our everyday existence. Playing off Thompson’s recurring actor motif, the running joke in entertainment is that waiting staffs are filled with aspiring actors, models and singers. Their dreams are in another realm, but they exist right here — much as one heaven is a thing of lore, while the other is to be experienced.

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"What's up Sydney? I haven't got a call back" (Paul Thompson – Sydney) | rejected

Thompson’s not homosexual — all the comments along those lines are trolling.